Match Group, LLC v. Bumble Trading Inc.

Western District of Texas, txwd-6:2018-cv-00080

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0 Exhibit G Part 2 of 2 0 PTO/AIA/14 (12-13) Approved for use through 01/31/2014. OMS 0651-0032 U.S. Patent and Trademark Office; U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, no persons are required to respond to a collection of information unless it contains a valid OMS control number. Attorney Docket Number 076533.0150 Application Data Sheet 37 CFR 1. 76 Application Number Title of Invention Matching Process System and Method Statement under 37 CFR 1.55 or 1.78 for AIA (First Inventor to File) Transition Applications This application (1) claims priority to or the benefit of an application filed before March 16, 2013 and (2) also contains, or contained at any time, a claim to a claimed invention that has an effective filing date on or after March D 16,2013. NOTE: By providing this statement under 37 CFR 1.55 or 1.78, this application, with a filing date on or after March 16, 2013, will be examined under the first inventor to file provisions of the AIA. Authorization to Permit Access: [SJ Authorization to Permit Access to the Instant Application by the Participating Offices If checked, the undersigned hereby grants the USPTO authority to provide the European Patent Office (EPO), the Japan Patent Office (JPO), the Korean Intellectual Property Office (KIPO), the World Intellectual Property Office (WIPO), and any other intellectual property offices in which a foreign application claiming priority to the instant patent application is filed access to the instant patent application. See 37 CFR 1.14(c) and (h). This box should not be checked if the applicant does not wish the EPO, JPO, KIPO, WIPO, or other intellectual property office in which a foreign application claiming priority to the instant patent application is filed to have access to the instant patent application. In accordance with 37 CFR 1.14(h)(3), access will be provided to a copy of the instant patent application with respect to: 1) the instant patent application-as-filed; 2) any foreign application to which the instant patent application claims priority under 35 U.S.C. 119(a)-(d) if a copy of the foreign application that satisfies the certified copy requirement of 37 CFR 1.55 has been filed in the instant patent application; and 3) any U.S. application-as-filed from which benefit is sought in the instant patent application. In accordance with 37 CFR 1.14(c), access may be provided to information concerning the date of filing this Authorization. Applicant Information: Providing assignment information in this section does not substitute for compliance with any requirement of part 3 of Title 37 of CFR to have an assignment recorded by the Office. EFS Web 2.2.11 Ex. G-278 0 PTO/AIA/14 (12-13) Approved for use through 01/31/2014. OMB 0651-0032 U.S. Patent and Trademark Office; U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, no persons are required to respond to a collection of information unless it contains a valid OMB control number. Attorney Docket Number 076533. 0150 Application Data Sheet 37 CFR 1. 76 Application Number Title of Invention Matching Process System and Method Applicant 1 If the applicant is the inventor (or the remaining joint inventor or inventors under 37 CFR 1.45), this section should not be completed. The information to be provided in this section is the name and address of the legal representative who is the applicant under 37 CFR 1.43; or the name and address of the assignee, person to whom the inventor is under an obligation to assign the invention, or person who otherwise shows sufficient proprietary interest in the matter who is the applicant under 37 CFR 1.46. If the applicant is an applicant under 37 CFR 1.46 (assignee, person to whom the inventor is obligated to assign, or person who otherwise shows sufficient proprietary interest) together with one or more joint inventors, then the joint inventor or inventors who are also the applicant should be identified in this section. Clear I I ® Assignee lo Legal Representative under 35 U.S.C. 117 lo Joint Inventor 0 Person to whom the inventor is obligated to assign. lo Person who shows sufficient proprietary interest If applicant is the legal representative, indicate the authority to file the patent application, the inventor is: I Name of the Deceased or Legally Incapacitated Inventor:I If the Applicant is an Organization check here. [SJ Organization Name I Tinder, Inc. Mailing Address Information For Applicant: Address 1 8899 Beverly Blvd. Address 2 City West Hollywood State/Province CA Count..Y I US Postal Code 90048 Phone Number Fax Number Email Address Additional Applicant Data may be generated within this form by selecting the Add button. Assignee Information including Non-Applicant Assignee Information: Providing assignment information in this section does not subsitute for compliance with any requirement of part 3 of Title 37 of CFR to have an assignment recorded by the Office. Assignee 1 Complete this section if assignee information, including non-applicant assignee information, is desired to be included on the patent application publication. An assignee-applicant identified in the "Applicant Information" section will appear on the patent application publication as an applicant. For an assignee-applicant, complete this section only if identification as an assignee is also desired on the patent application publication. If the Assignee or Non-Applicant Assignee is an Organization check here. D EFS Web 2.2.11 Ex. G-279 0 PTO/AIA/14 (12-13) Approved for use through 01/31/2014. OMB 0651-0032 U.S. Patent and Trademark Office; U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, no persons are required to respond to a collection of information unless it contains a valid OMB control number. Attorney Docket Number 076533.0150 Application Data Sheet 37 CFR 1.76 Application Number Title of Invention I Matching Process System and Method - Prefix Given Name Middle Name Family Name Suffix Mailing Address Information For Assignee including Non-Applicant Assignee: Address 1 Address 2 City I State/Province Countryi I Postal Code Phone Number Fax Number Email Address Additional Assignee or Non-Applicant Assignee Data may be generated within this form by selecting the Add button. Signature: NOTE: This form must be signed in accordance with 37 CFR 1.33. See 37 CFR 1.4 for signature requirements and certifications. Signature /e /~ ---Z~/,,<"'"/L---~' Date (YYYY-MM-DD) 2016-02-05 First Name Roshan S. I Last Name I Mansinghani Registration Number 62429 Additional Signature may be generated within this form by selecting the Add button. This collection of information is required by 37 CFR 1. 76. The information is required to obtain or retain a benefit by the public which is to file (and by the USPTO to process) an application. Confidentiality is governed by 35 U.S.C. 122 and 37 CFR 1.14. This collection is estimated to take 23 minutes to complete, including gathering, preparing, and submitting the completed application data sheet form to the US PTO. Time will vary depending upon the individual case. Any comments on the amount of time you require to complete this form and/or suggestions for reducing this burden, should be sent to the Chief Information Officer, U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, U.S. Department of Commerce, P.O. Box 1450, Alexandria, VA 22313-1450. DO NOT SEND FEES OR COMPLETED FORMS TO THIS ADDRESS. SEND TO: Commissioner for Patents, P.O. Box 1450, Alexandria, VA 22313-1450. EFS Web 2.2.11 Ex. G-280 0 Privacy Act Statement The Privacy Act of 1974 (P.L. 93-579) requires that you be given certain information in connection with your submission of the attached form related to a patent application or patent. Accordingly, pursuant to the requirements of the Act, please be advised that: (1) the general authority for the collection of this information is 35 U.S.C. 2(b)(2); (2) furnishing of the information solicited is voluntary; and (3) the principal purpose for which the information is used by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office is to process and/or examine your submission related to a patent application or patent. If you do not furnish the requested information, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office may not be able to process and/or examine your submission, which may result in termination of proceedings or abandonment of the application or expiration of the patent. The information provided by you in this form will be subject to the following routine uses: 1. The information on this form will be treated confidentially to the extent allowed under the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552) and the Privacy Act (5 U.S.C. 552a). Records from this system of records may be disclosed to the Department of Justice to determine whether the Freedom of Information Act requires disclosure of these records. 2. A record from this system of records may be disclosed, as a routine use, in the course of presenting evidence to a court, magistrate, or administrative tribunal, including disclosures to opposing counsel in the course of settlement negotiations. 3. 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A record in this system of records may be disclosed, as a routine use, to another federal agency for purposes of National Security review (35 U.S.C. 181) and for review pursuant to the Atomic Energy Act (42 U.S.C. 218(c)). 7. A record from this system of records may be disclosed, as a routine use, to the Administrator, General Services, or his/her designee, during an inspection of records conducted by GSA as part of that; agency's responsibility to recommend improvements in records management practices and programs, under authority of 44 u.s:c: 2904 and 2906. Such disclosure shall be made in accordance with the GSA regulations governing inspection of records for this purpose, and any other relevant (i.e., GSA or Commerce) directive. Such disclosure shall not be used to make determinations about individuals. 8. A record from this system of records may be disclosed, as a routine use, to the public after either publication of the application pursuant to 35 U.S.C. 122(b) or issuance of a patent pursuant to 35 U.S.C. 151. Further, a record may be disclosed, subject to the limitations of 37 CFR 1.14, as a routine use, to the public if the record was filed in an application which became abandoned or in which the proceedings were terminated and which application is referenced by either a published application, an application open to public inspections or an issued patent. 9. A record from this system of records may be disclosed, as a routine use, to a Federal, State, or local law enforcement agency, ifthe USPTO becomes aware of a violation or potential violation of law or regulation. EFS Web 2.2.11 Ex. G-281 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0146 lf:ATCHING PROCESS SYSTEM 11-.ND METHOD ~.:§I:0:!~~R"__~E.~f'..!:.g~-~.:f-2.!:! This application is a continuation-i.n-pax.-t of Serial No. 12/339,301, entitled "MATCHING PROCESS SYSTEM AND METHOD," Attorney's DocJ.;.:et 076533. 01.30 filed December 19, 5 2008. This application cl.aims benefi.t under 35 U.S.C. § 11.9(e) to U.S, Provisional Application Serial No. 61/793, 866, entitled "SOCIAL:M...l\TCHING SYSTEM AND METHOD," Attorney's Docket 076533.0l46, filed March 15, 2013. 10 TECHNICAL FIELD -------··-----------·--·-------------------------------·· This invention relates generally to computer matching systems and more particularly to a matching process system and method. 1.5 Ex. G-282 0 1\.'l"I'ORNEY I s DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0146 ~~£?&9-~~2~I!:~I2 Networki.ng architectures have grown increasingly complex in communicat.i.ons environments. In recent years, a series of protocols and configurations have been 5 de\reloped in order to accommodate a di verse group of end users hav:i.ng various networki.ng needs. Many of these architectures have ga.ined significant:notoriety because they can offer the benef:i.t.s of automation, convenience, management, and enhanced consumer selections. 10 Certain network protocols may be used in order to allow an end user to conduct an on-line search of candidates to fill a given vacancy. These protocols may relate to job searches, person finding services, real estate searches, or on-line dating. While some believe 1.5 that on-Line dating is simply a matter of matching supply and demand, there is statistical a:nd empirical evidence to su9gest that successful on- line dating entails far more. For e:xa.mple, people having similar and/or compatible 2O character traits and values shO'uld be matched together. However, effectively linking two participants together can. prove to be a challen.gi.ng endeavor. Coordinating a. relationship between tv.ro like-minded .ind.iv:Lduals can be a significant chore, as there are a number of obstacles and 25 barriers that must be overcome. One problem that has arisen is that matching serv1-ces are limited to searching for matches only within their own platform. 'l'hus, only people who have gone through the process 0-r signing up fo1:- the service are 30 searched for a match. One solution to this problem is to have users register in multi.ple services. This is problematic because it can be expensive and time Ex. G-283 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0146 3 consuming for users. Further, the user must then visit all of the services to monitor the search progress~ this inefficiency may cause users to give up on the search process. 5 Another prohl.em i.s that the search results or these services contain many irrelevant entities to the seaxcher. This costs the user of the service ti.me a.nd may deter them from cont.inu.ing through all of the search results. 10 Another problem is that. large numbers o.f unwanted communication. requests can become a nuisance to t:he user. Too rnany nuisance requests may deter the user from further use of the system. Users wi.th the most attractive profiles are oftentimes the ones that receive 15 the most unwanted attention. If the users with the most attractive profiles cease to use the system, the quality of the user pool deteriorates. Ex. G-284 0 ATTORN'EY' S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0146 4 SUM!VlARY »•••T>>>•>•>•>•••n~···~· In one embodiment, a method for profile matching comprises receiving a plurality of user p:r:ofiles, each user proi':ile comprising traits of a respect.ive user. rt 5 also comprises receiving a preference indication for a first user profile of the plurality of user profiles. It further comprises determining a potential match user profile o.f. th.e plurality of user profiles based on the preference indication .for the first user profile. The lO method also comprises presenting the potential match l.lse:i:: profile to a second user. Receiving a preference indication for a first use:c profile may incTude receiving from a third user a recommendation of the first user profile for the second 15 user. It may also include receiving from the second user a preference indication for the first. user profile. The method may further include determining a score of a third u.ser profile of the plurality of user profiles as a potential match for the second user. It may also include 20 altering the score of the third user. prof.:U.e based on the pr.·eference i.ndicaL:ion for the fi:cst user profil.e. In a:r1othex· embodiment, a method for profile matching comprises receiving a plurality of user profiles, each user profile comprising traitB of a respective user. 'l'he 25 method further comprises receiv:i.ng a. request for matches from a first user, the first user associated with a first user profile. The method also comprises scoring the p1u:rality of user profiles:for potent:Lal matching with the first user based on comparisons of the plurality of 30 user profiles with the first user profile. It: also comprises identifying a second user profile of the plurality of user prof ilea ae a potential match for the Ex. G-285 0 P..TTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533. O:J.46 5 first user based on the scoring. The method further comprises identifying commonality between a third user profile of the pJ.urality of user profiles and the second user profile .. In addition, the method comprises 5 presenting to the first user the third user profile as a potential match for the first user. Depending on thf.~ specific features implemented, particular embodiments may exhibit some, none, or a.1.1 o.f. the following technical advantages. Various embodiments 10 may be capable of dynamically updating match search results based on user activity. Some embodiments may be capable of enhancing match search resu.1ts by reducing the impact of restrictive user preferences. In ad.di.t:Lon, some embodiments may provide the ability to evaluate the l5 attractiveness of potential matches. Various embodiments may be ca.pab1.e of .importing u.ser profiles from other socia1-net<.r.rorking systems. Some embodiments may be capable of generating the pool of. users based on both explicit and implicit criteria derived from other soc.ial 20 networking systems. Other technical advantages will be read.ily apparent to one skilled in U1e art from the following figures, description and claims. Ex. G-286 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0146 6 ~~-I-~E:----~-~.es:g~:fR~~g~____9_~---.'.~:~.!?....P.~!~-~~~-~ Reference i.s now made to the following description taken in conjunct. ion w.i. th t,he accompanying drawings, where.in like reference numbers represent like parts, and 5 which: FIGURE J.A:Ls an overview of one embodiment of the matching system; FIGURE 1.B shows the contents of the terminal from FIGURE:LA; 10 FIGOT-{E:Le shows the contents of the matching server from FIGURE lA; FIGURE lD is a di.agram of a database from FIGURE ic showing one embodiment of how a matching server stores a pool; 15 FIGURE lE is a diagram of the display from FIGURE lB showing one embodiment of the presentation of search results to a user; FIGURE 1.P is a diagram of the display .f.rom FIGURE lB showing one embodiment of the presentation. of details of 20 a match result entity to a user; FIGURE 2 is a diagram depicting how a 1..rner ma.y recommend an entity to another user, in accordance with a part.icular embodiment; FIGURE 3 .is a diagram of the display from FIGURE 1B 25 depicting how the user may be made aware of fa.te characteristics the user shares with a match result entity, in accordance with a particular embodiment; FIGURE 4 is a diagram depicting how t.wo platforms may be searched for a match, in accordance with a 30 particular embodiment; Ex. G-287 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0146 7 FIGURE 5 is a flow chart indicating how a result list may be generated, in accordance with a particular embodiment; FIGURE 6 shows one embodiment of the mat:chi.:ng system 5 displayin.g to a user the profile information of a second user; FIGURE 7 is a diagram of the display from FIGURE 6 showing t:he effect of a left swipe gesture; FIGURE 8 is a diagram of the display f.rom FIGURE 6 10 showing the effect of a rig-ht swipe gesture; FIGURE 9 shows the matching system displaying a match of a first: \.lSer and a second user, in accordance with a particular embodiment; FIGURE 10 is a flo'"'ichart depicting a met.hod for 15 enabling communication between two users of the matching system o:t FIGURE 1 based on a mutual expression of approval.,:i.n accordance w:Lth a particular embodiment; FIGURE 1.l is a flowchart depicting a method for enabling communication between two users of the matching 20 system of FIGURE 1. based on a user suggested matchin~J proposa1, in accordance wi.t:h a particular embodiment; and FIGURES 12A···D depict embod i.rnen t r1 of a user interface. Ex. G-288 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533. OJA6 8 P~~~~:?.:.~.~~P.... P~.?..q~~.R.'£.?;.9.~ Referring to F'IGURE 1.A, one embodiment of a matching system is shown.. FIGURE 1A is a simplified block diagram of system 1.00 for facilitating an on-line dating 5 scenario in. a network env.i ronment. In other embodiments, system 100 can be leveraged to i.denti.fy and to evaluate suitable candidates in other areas (e.g. hiring/employment, recruiting,:re<.:tl estate, general person searches, etc.). tJsers 1.4 int.:eract with a 10 matching server 20 through terminals J.O. FIGURE lB is a diagram showing, in one embodiment, the contents of terminal J.O. Terminal 10 comprises interface 1.6 (so t.hat: user l4 may be able to intera.ct with terminal l" V}' and display 1.2. FIGURE lC is a diagram showing, in one lS embodiment, the contents of matching server 20. Matching server 20 comprises memory 26 and at least one CPU 28, Memory 26 may store multiple databases, such as databases 26a and 26b. Terminal 1.0 and matching server 20 are communicatively coupled vi.a network connections 22 and 20:n.f.~twork 24. Users 1.4 are clients, customers, prospective customei:-s, or entities wishin.H to participate in an on- line dat.in.g scenario a.nd/o:r to view information associated with other participants in the system. Users 25 14 may also seek to access or to initiate a communication wi.t:h ot:her users that ma-y be delivered via network 24. Users l·1 rna.y review data {such as profiles, for exampJ.e) associated with other users in order to make matching decisions or elections. Data, as used herein, refers to 30 any type of numeric, voice, video, text, or script data, or any other suit.abJ.e information in any appropriate Ex. G-289 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT .l-t.PPLICATION 076533. OJ.46 9 format that may be communicated from one point to another. In one embodiment:, terminal lO represents (and is i.ncl.us:i.ve of) a personal computer that may be used to 5 access network 24. .A.l. ter.nat:Lve1y, terminal 10 may be representative of a celluJ~ar te1.epb.one, an electronic notebook, a laptop, a personal digital ass.istant {PDA), or any other suitable device (wireless or otherwise: some of v•hich can perform web browsing}, component, or element 10 capable of accessing one or more elements within system 100, Interface 16, which may be provided in conjunction with the items 1.isted above, may further comprir-.:ie any suitable interface for a. human user such as a video camera, a microphone, a keyboard, a mouse, or any other 15 appropriate equipment according t;o particular conf.igurations and arrangements, In addition, interface 16 may be a unique element designed specifically for communications involving system 1.00. Such an element may be fabricated or produced speci.fi.cally for matching 20 applications i.nvolving a user, Disp.la.y 12, in one embodiment, is comput:er monitor. hlternatively, di.splay 12 may be a projector, speaker, or other device that allows user:L4 to appreciate information that system 100 transmits. 25 Network 24 is a communicative platfc>'x:m operable to exchange data or information emanating .f.rom ust=.:r 14. Network 24 could be a plain old telephone sy:::1tem (POTS). Transmission of. ini'.ormation emanating from the user may be assisted by management associated with matching server 30 20 or manually keyed i.nto a telephone or other suitable electronic equipment. In other embodiments, network 24 could be any packet data .network offering a Ex. G-290 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0146 10 communications:interface cir exchange between any two nodes in system 100. Network 24 may alternatively be any local area network (LP...N) ' metropolitan area network (MM\l.), wi.de area. network (WAN), wireless local area 5 network (WLAN) virtual private network {VPN) int.ranet, or any other appropriate architecture or system that f.aci1.it.ates communi.cat.i.ons in a network or telephonic environment, including a combination of any network~1 or systems described above. In various embodiments, network 10 connections 22 may include, but are not limited to, wired and/or wireless mediums which may be pro\risioned with routers and firewalls. f.'Iatching server 20 is operable to receive and to communicate information to terminal lO. In some 15 embodiments, matching server may comprise a plurality of servers or other equipment; each performing different. or the same functions in order to receive and communicate information to terminal 1. 0. Matching server 20 may include software and/or algorithms to achieve the 20 operations for processing, communicating, deLivering, ga.therin.g, uploading, mai.ntain.1.ng, and/or generally managing data, as described herein. Alternati·vely, such operations and techniques may be achieved by any suitable hardware, component, device, application spec:t• ..•.4! .i.c ' 25 integrated circuit {ASIC} additional software, field programmable gate a.r:ray server, processor, algorithm, era.sable programmable ROM { EPROM}, electrically erasable programmabTe ROM (EEPROM), or any other suitable object that is operable to facilitate such 30 operations. In some embodiments, user 14, using term~nal 10, registers with matching server 20. Heg:Lst:r.ation may Ex. G-291 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0146 ll include user l4 submitting .information to matching server 2 O about user 14 as well a.s charact.eris tics user 14 is seeking to be matched with. Such information may inclt.ide a user handle, which may be a combination of characters 5 tlJ.at. t.1I1.iq11e1.y id.ent.if.i.es use·r 14 to matchir1g server 20. In various embodiments, mat.ch.i.ng server 20 may be configured to collect this i.n:f.orrnat:Lon; .f.or example, matching server 20 may be configured to ask user JA to respond to a series of questions. Matching server 20 may 10 be configured to recei.ve the information submitted by user 1.'a and create a profile for user 1.·'1 based on that information, storing the prof:ile in memory 26. As an example only, cons:i.der a case where user 14 is interested:in participating iri an on··· line dating 15 scenario. User 14 can access the Internet via terminal 1.0, travel to a web site managed by matching server 20, and begin the~ registration process. l\S part of the registration process, matching server 20 may ask user 14 a ser1es of questions which identifies characteristics 20 a.bout ·user l.A 'l'hus, matching sex:ver 20 may ask about the height, weight, age, location, and ethnicity of user 1.4. It may alt;io ask about the birthplace, parents, eating habits, activities, and goals of user 14~ Matching server 20 may further use the registration 25 procE;ss to discover what user 1 1:1 may be looking for in a match, such as age, weight, height, location, et~hnicity, diet, educat:ton, etc. Further, matching se:rv«.=::r 20 may ask user 11:1 to indicate how irnportant certain factors are when Looking for a rnat:ch. For example, matching server 30 20 may allow the user to indicate which charact.e:risti.cs in a potential match are a necessity. In an.other example, matching serveJ'.' 20 may ask, "How important is i t Ex. G-292 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533. 01.46 12 that your match does not smoke?" Matching server 20 may al.so allow the user to indicate that certain chara.cter:i.sti.cs are not important search cr.iteria. For example, wh.en ask.i ng user 14 about what height or weight: 5 user 14 is seeking in a match, matching server 20 may be configured to receive "not important" a.s a response, In yet another examp1.e, matching server 20 may al.low user 14 to rate which factors are important on a numerical scale. For example, matching server 20 may ask user 14 the lO following: "On a scale of 1 1. '-'I f'\ how import.ant is it that your match has the same education level as you?" In some embodiments, matching- server 20 may specify that any number of questions or requested descriptions are necessary before registration may be concluded. As an l5 example only, matching server 20 may require that user 14 communicate the sex of user 14 and the sex user 14 prefers to be matched with. After concluding the registration process, matching server 20 may store the:responses of user 14 as a profile. This same process may 20 be repeat.ed by se"\re1..,al different users 14, causing matching server 20 to contain a plurality of profiles. FIGURE 1.D depicts an embodiment in which matching server 20 has a database 26a '"'hich contains a pool 30. Each entry in database 20a has a pool entity 30a along 25 with int o:r:ma t~ ion concerning that entity. In one embodiment, each pool entity 30a-e represents a user and thel:.i:: profile. In some embodiments, not all registered users are in pool 30. As discussed further below, matching server 20 may use a selection process for 30 including stored profiles in pool 30. As depicted in FIGURE lD, in this embodiment, the collection of users and profiles forms pool 30 through which matching server Ex. G-293 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT l\..PPLICATION 076533. OJ.46 l3 20 may perform various functions such as searches for matches. Matching server 20 may be configured to search through pool 30 and present matches to user l4. In 5 FIGURE 1E, one embodiment of this presentation:i.s depicted aE1 occurrj_ng through display J.2. In various embodiments, matches may be presented to user 1.4 utilizing other communi.cation sche:nes, such as electronic m<:.:ssages (i.e., e-mail) or text messages (i.e., utiliz:i.ng J.O SMS) . In t:li.e depicted embodiment, a result list 31 is presented to user 14. A match resuJ. t: entity 3 la in a result list 31 may be associated with a view button 33. Using interface 15, user J.4 may:request that matching server 20 provide more information about an entity in 15 result l:i.st 31 by pressing the associated view button 33. Matching server 20 may then communicate to user l4 more information about that entity by retrieving the information from memory 26. In FIGURE 1F', one embodiment of information that match.i.n.g server 2 O provides for user 20 14 is shown. Using display 12, user J.4 viev·ts an entity from result l i s t 3J.. lYiat:ching server 20 may also provide user 14 with the ability to contact the entity through a contact button 35. In one embodiment, when contact but~ton 35 is utilized by user i.:1, matching server 20 may 25 provide user 14 with contact information of the entity such as a teJ.ephone number or an e-mail address; in another embodiment, rnat:chi.ng server 20 may provide user 14 wi.th a way to directly contact the entity, such as sending a message or providin9 voice video 30 communication between user 14 and the entity. Even further, matching server 20 may be configured to allow user 14 to express a nega.tive preference for the entit·y Ex. G-294 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0146 14 through dislike button 36, In one embodiment, when, for example, dislike button 36 is utilized by user 14, matching server 20 may remove the entity from resu1.t l i s t 31; in another embodiment, the entity may be removed from 5 pool 30 of users from which matches are identified. As an example on1.y, consider that u.ser 14 has submitted a search request to matching server 20. Matching server 20 may search through pool 30, identify results, and communicate result l i s t 31 to user 14 which lO would contain other users .for whom matching server 20 had created a profile and who were identi.fi.ed through a search and selection process. Next, user 14 may be .interested in learning more about Jane Doe, ent.i ty 31.a; thus, user 1.4 would c-1.ict"...: view button 33 associated with 1.5 Jane Doe. Matching server 20 would receive this request and respond by di.splaying Ja.nt'.! Doe's profile (stored in memory 26), as depicted in FIGURE 1.F. Next, after reading the profile, user 14 may be interested in contacting J'ane Doe; hence, user 14 would click contact 20 button 35. Matching server 20 would respond by allowing user 1..<1 f.'.!nter a message that matching server 20 would then communi_ ca te to Jane Doe. Matching server 20 may even further be configured to allow user 14 to store a match result entity; in one 25 embodiment, the system may be configured to allow user 14 to uti.l.ize. fa»rori.te button 3<J t.hat will add the desired matcl1. result. entit·y into another li.st. In anot.her embodiment, utilizin9 favorite bu.tton. 34 will remove the associated match result entity from result list 31.. 30 As an example only, user 1.4 may decide that he would like to save Jane Doe's profi.le so that he can review i t later. User 14 may click favorite button 34, and Ex. G-295 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533. o:t-46 15 matching server 20 ma.y respond by placing Jane Doe's profile into a separate ~List. Further, matching server 20 may also remove Jane Doe from user's 14 result list 31.. As a resu1.t, user 14 may see another match result 5 entity populate result list 31. This is beneficial because it may focus user 1.4 on evaluating n€P"'' entities rather than reevaluating previously-known entities because the entities still appear in result l i s t 31. In some embodiments, matchi:ng server 2O may be 1.0 configured to generate pool 30 by default acco:i:·ding to various chax:acterist:ics and preferences of user 1-1 and other users of the system. Matching server 20 may also restrict entities from being included in pool 30 based on the status of the profile, or if user 14 has rejected or 15 blocked an entity. Matching server 20 may also restrict entities from the pool that have blocked or rejected user 1.1;1, • For example, matching server 20 may not allow profiles that axe not. in good standing to be inclu.ded in pool 30, In other embodiments, matching- server 20 may be 20 confi.gured to generate pool 30 by first choos.i.ng seeds. Seeds inclctde, but are not limited to, profiles th2~t user 14 has sent a messag·e to or profiles that user lA has expressed a preference for. Each seed is then compared to other entities to determine which entities will be 2.5 included in pool 30. Any suitable method can be used to determine which entities are included in pool 30. For exampJ.e, a.ny characteristics or algorithms described herein may form the basis of such a determination. As another example, a commonality· score may be generated 30 based on the comparison between each entity and the seed. In some embodiments, this commonality score can be a measure of how phys:l.caJ.1.y similar Lhe users are to each Ex. G-296 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0146 16 other. This score may be g·enerated based on the number of users that have expressed a positive preference for both the seed and the entity being compared. This score may also be generated based on whether the seed and 5 entity have been viewed together in one session; further, the more times the seed and entity have been viev..red together, the larger the comrnon.ali ty score. The law of large numbers may allow for a vast a.mount of· such commonalities to be established over a few days. Testing 10 has revealed that using such commonality scoring methods hat':> yielded at least one physical match for 80% of users whose prof:ile has been viewed at least. once, and between 6 and lOOO physicaJ. matches for 60% of users whose profile has been viewed at J.east once. Matching server 15 20 may be further configured t.o allow entities that have a. commonali. ty score above a certain threshold to become a pa:t:-t of. pool 30. Matching server 20 may further be configured to update pool 30. In some embodiments, matching server 20 may do so by creating new seed 20 entities based on activity by user 14, such as indicating a preference for that entity. Further, matching server 20 ma.y then crnnpare the chosen seed entity with other profiles stored in matching server 20 a.nd determine whether those profi.les will be included in pool .3 O using 25 a threshold score as described above. At least one advantage realized by this embodiment is that user 14 is presented with updated potential matches which increases the likelihood of user 14 finding a s'l.1:Lt.:abl.e match. Another advantage present in certain embodiments is that 30 these updated potential matches have a greater likelihood of cornpatibi1ity with user 14 since they are chosen ba.sed Ex. G-297 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0l46 1.7 on their commonali.ty with ent:.ities user 1.4 has expressed a preference for. As an example only, consider the case in which user J.4 has registered, requested a search, and received from 5 matching server 20 results list 31. 'I'hen, user 1.4 decides to conta.ct Jane Doe and presses contact button 35. Aside from providing user JA with the abil:i.ty to contact Jane Doe, matching server 20 will designate Jane Doe' s prof i .1.e as a. seed. Matching server 20 'Nill then 10 compare Jane Doe's prot':i1e to other profiles stored in tnemory 26 in order to identify other ·u.sers who may be similar to Jane Doe and thus be a good match for user 14. In t:his example, matching server 20 w:Lll generate a commonality score for each of. these comparisons and 1.5 compare these scores to a preset th:r:eshold. If the commonality score is lower than the threshold, that profile will not be added to pool. 30. However., i.f. the commonality score is higher than the threshold, matching server 20 wiJ.l add this profile to pool 30. As an 20 example, further assume that the seed, Jane Doe, is being compared to another entity, Susan Smith. Based on the fact that. both Susan and Jane have three users (Tom, Dick, a.nd Harry) who have expressed a positive preference.~ for their prof.Lles, ·matching server 20 generates a 25 commonality score cd: ].. 00 fox: the comparison. In contrast, matching server 20 generated a commonality score of 50 £or the comparison between the seed (Jane Doe) and yet another entity, Lucy Goosey, 'This was because on.ly one user {Bob) had indicated a positive 3o preference toward both Lucy a:nd Jane. Continuing the example, matching server 20 is using a commonality threshold score of 70, which results i.n including Susan's Ex. G-298 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT _?>,.PPLICATION 076533.01.46:lB profile (whose commonality score was greater than the threshold score) in pool 30 and excluding Lucy's {whose commonality score was less than the threshold. score) . Thus, user 14 gets the l;enefit of having more entities 5 identified that may be good matches. In some embodiments, matching server 20 may be configured to include behavioral scales. These may include multi-item scales for materialism and gender-role t.:r.a.dit.ionalism. Such scales may provide the adv«:u1.tage of lO .improved matching through deeper appreciation for the personality of entities in the system. In some embodiment.s, tnatching server 20 may be configured to analyze profile text for categories, It may search for number of text and then l5 associate the profile with any number of categ·orie:s. A.s an example only, matching· server 2 o may add any profile to the Cat category whose text contains any of the following strings! 20 "cat" "catsff •cat." "cats." "cat," ~cats," Matching server 2O may be conf i.gured to make .it more likely that a profile will be in a result list i.£ categories associated with the profile are also categories:found in the user's profile who submitted the search request. Matching server 20 may be configured to a.nalyze one or more portions of the text. of an entity's profLLe and generate a readabi.li ty score t.hat:. may be used in various 30 ways, such as in the process o.f. searching for matches for user l4. In some embod:Lments, matching server 20 may analyze .factors such as, but not limited to: average Ex. G-299 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0146 l9 number of words per sentence, total number of words with greater t:han three syllables, and total number of words:in the profile. Matching server 20 may also concatenate all of the collected responses with a single space 5 between them. It may furt.h.er break the text into sentences, words, and syllables. From these st.atistics 1 matching server 20 may also be configured to generate a readability score by, in one embodiment, t.:<.::1.k..i.ng the a:verag(--; of t:.h.e Flesch Kincaid Reading Ease test, the 10 Flesch Kincaid Gra.de Level test, and the Gunning Fo:x: score. Other embodiments may utilize any other combination. 0£ these or other teats to de~ermine a readability score. In some embodiments, a.na1.yses may be used to determine t:he IQ of an entity, the grade I.evel of 15 the writing, or how nervous the entity generally is. An advantage of this embodiment may· be that the system provides user 14 with a metric for determining a:ppro:ximate .intelligence of other users. The readability score may be used, for example, in. the matching process 20 to identify potential matches. As an example only, t.he Flesch Kincaid Reading Ease score lnay be generated by first computing the following intermf.~diat:e score: 25 206.835 (J_. 01.5 * [Average Words per .Sentence) (84.6 * (Average Syllables per Word]) Then, the Flesch I<~incaid Reading Ease scox·e is determined by using the following tab1.e: 30 Ex. G-300 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0146 20 < 1.00 4 < 91. 5 <. 8l 6 The FJ.escb. Kincaid Grade Level may be computed according to the .following: 5 (o. 3 9 * (Average Words Per Sentence)) + (1.1. 8 * [Average Syllables Per Word]) - 15.59 The Gunning Fox score may be computed according to the following: 10 [Average Words Per Sentence] + ({[Number Of Words With More Than 3 Syllables] I [Number of Words In Ent.ire Text J) + 1. o o)) * O. 4 15 As indicated, any suitable tests may be utilized in any suitable manner to determine a readability score, In some embodiments, matching server 20 may be configured to aJ.1.ow a user to interact with the result list of another user. Matching server 20 may be Ex. G-301 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533. Q].L16 21 configured to allow a user to express a preference for entities within a result list of another user, and to .i.ndi.cate to the other user of this preference. Thus, a user may be a.hle to get: advice from a friend regarding 5 what other users ma.y constitute good matches for the user and thLlS be able to f:ind a. .better match. As an e:x:a:mple o:nl y, cons i.der FIGURES lA and FIGURE 2. Two users 1A,, Harry and Sally, are connected to;r12:.tching server 20 via terminals 1.0. Display 1.2a:i.s used J.O by Harry '"'lhile display 1.2b is used by Sally. I><iatc.hing server 20 allows Sally to view Har:r:y' s result list 31 on her terminal in display l2b. By pressing recommend button 37, Sally may indicate a preference for one or more of the entities in resu1.t list 31.. Asm..ime Sally 15 presses recommend button 37 associated with Jane Loe. After doing so, matching server 20 will notify Harry of Sally's preference, On Harry's display 12a, matching server 20 wi.ll. cause notification 39 to appear, assoc.iating i.t wi.th ~rane Loe, Notification 39 v.rill 20 indicatl:: to Harry that Sally has recommended Jane Loe as a potential match. Harry may find Sally's preference helpful in deterrnining which entities he should pursue further if,:for example, he believes Sa.1..ly u.nde.r:stands the type of person he is 1ook:lng for. 25 In one embodiment, matching server 20 may be configured to analyze the profiles of both user 1.4 and the entities in pool 30 for keywords. Matching- server 20 may be configured to search through the profile of user 14 for keywords that relate to things such as activities 30 and interests. Matching server 20 may generate a score for each entity in pool 30 based on a comparison between the list of keywords found in user's 1.4 pro:f.:Lle <..=tnd a Ex. G-302 0 A'I'TORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT .APPLICATION 076533. 01.46 22 similarly-generated list of keywords of each entity in pool 30. In one embodiment, this is accomplished by stori.ng a. list of words in memory 26, and using it to identify keywords in the searched profiles. In some 5 ernbodime:nts, identified k.eywords may be used as a means of Vv'E.dghting various scores. As an example only, a profile that contains the word "God" may be weighted much differently than a pro£:L1e which has merely indicated that their religious preference is Christiau1. In various lO embodiments, this may provide an advantage to user 14 in that user 14 is able to determine how similar he/she is with a potential match. In addition, the keyword analysis may be used by the system when searching and identifying· matches for a user. 15 As a.n. example only, consider two registered users, Harry and Sally, both o:E whom have profiles stored in matching server 20. Matching· server 20 then ana J.yzes each of these profiles by comparing it to a list of predefined keywords. Matching server 20 then associates 20 each word tha.t ·matched the list of keywords with each profile. Now assume that Harry performs a search, While fulfilling Harry's query, matching server 20 eva1.uates Sal].y' B profile for inclusion .in Harry's result li"st 31.. This eva.luation includes comparing the list of keyv.mrds 25 found in Ha:ery' s profile to the keywords found in Sally's pro:Eile. The more keywords that Harry and Sally have in common, the more likely it will be that matcbing server 20 will i.nclude Sally's pro.file in Harry's resuJ.t list 31. 30 In some embod:iments, matchin~J server 20 may be configured to impute a level of physical attractiveness to an entity in pool 3 O. Matching server 20 may be Ex. G-303 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0146 23 configured to monitor how frequent an entity in pool 30 has been viewed as well as how many times that entity has been part of a result list in order to impute the level of. physica.J. a:tt;ractiveness. Matchi.ri.g server 20 may 5 further be conf .i.gured to 9enerate a score based on this data. Further,:Ln some embodiments, match.ing server 20 may impute physical attractiveness to an entiLy based on the imputed physical attractiveness scores of ot.her entities. M:atchi.ng server 20 may compute an average of 10 the imputed physical attx:act.iveness scores of the other ent.ities weighted by the commonality score between each of the other entities and the present ent i t.y. Empirical data ind~cates that people are more likely to match with people of similar attractiveness. 'I'hus, in many 1.5 embodiments, a user may obtain an advantage in th.at thf.~Y are able to be presented with potential matches that, according to one measurement, are as at tract i. ve as the user. As an exampJ.e only, consider a registered user, 20 Sally, whose profile was created by matching server 20 in,:ranuary. Since that time, matching server 20 has recorded the number of times Sally's profile ha.s appeared in any user's result list 31; assume that thi.s has occurred 10 times. Fu.1:-t:her, matching server 2 O has a1 so 25 recorded the number of ti.mes a user has viewed Sally's profi.le by clicking view button. 33 associated with Sally's profile; assume that this has happened 5 times. In this manner, matching server 20 has constructed a rat.io that represents t.he imputed physica~L attractiveness 30 of Sally's profile. St:ill further, assume that Harry, a registered user, now submits a query. Matching server 20 has evaluated the imputed physical attractiveness ratio Ex. G-304 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PA'I'EN'l' A.PPLICATION 076533.0146 24 of Harry's profile. When evalua.ti.ng Sally's profile for inclusion in result list 3l returned to Harry, matching server 20 will compare the imputed physical attractiveness of SaLl.y' s profile and Harry's profile. 5 The more similar the ratios assoc.iat:ed with Harry and Sally's pro:t:Lles are to each other, the more J.ikely i t is that Sally's profile will be selected by match.i.ng server 20 to be in Harry's result l i s t 31. In another example, assume that Sally's prof:Lle has not been registered long 10 enough to generate a meaning·ful imputed physical attractiveness ratio. Matching- server 20 may then 9en.erate an imputed physical. attractiveness score based on entities that Sally does have commo:nality scores with. This comput.:ed average may be weighted by t.:he strength of 15 the commonalit.:y score between Sally and each entity with whom she has a. commonality score. Continuing the example, assume that Sally has a commonality score of. 5 with Lucy and 1O with Jul:La. When matching server 2D comp1.l.tes the Sally's average, i t w:i.1.1 give twice as much 20 weight to Julia's imputed physicaJ. attractiveness score than to Lucy's. In some embodiments, matching server 20 may be configured to make an entity in result list 3l more appealing to user l4 by pointing out co.incidences in the 25 profile data that give user 14 a sense of fate with the entity. In one embodiment, matching- server 20 may be configured to search for similar i.nitials, birth.p~la.ces, birth dates, birth month, birth year, university, t.irst names, last names, user handles, parental occupations, 30 and keywords to identify users who may gj_ve another user a sense of fate. In other embodiments, matching se:cver Ex. G-305 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKE'l' PATENT APPLICATION 076533.01.46 25 20 may use the fat:e characteristics a.s a metric in the matching process. As an example only, assume that Harry is a registered user who has performed a search. After 5 matching server 20 returns a result list, Harry chooses to lea.rn more about one of the ent:i.ties in the resu1.t l i s t and clicks view button 33. Consider FIGURE 3, which is only an example of information that matching server 20 may return to Harry after clicking view button 33. In lO Ha.rry's dispJ.ay 1.2 i matching server 20 presents certain details about the profile. In particular, matching se:i~ver 20 presents to Harry a fate noti£icat.ion 32 which points out speci.i'.ic similarities between the profile of the entity and Harry's profile. Reading fate 15 notification 32 gives Harry a sense of:familiarity which enhances his appreciation for the profile. In another example, fate characteristics may be used to decide whether a profile in pool 30 is included in u.ser' s 1.4 resu1t list 31. Assume that. Harry is a 20 registered user who has submitted a matching query to matchi.ng server 20. Whi.1.e determining which entities to include in Barry's result J.:Lst, matching server 20 considers two profiles: Sally and Roxy. Sa 1.ly and Harry both have the same birth date, initials, and have parents 25 th.at work in the same profession. In contrast, Roxy and Barry only share the same birth place. Matching· server 20 may be configured to award more points to Sally than to Roxy based on these comparisons, making i t more likely that Sally's profile will be included in Harry• s result 30 list. In some embodiments, matching server 20 may be configured to evaluate the likelihood of contact between Ex. G-306 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PJ\.TENT APPLICATION 076533. 01.46 26 user 14 and an entity in pool 30. Matching server 20 may be configured to compare demographic da.ta between user 14 and pool. entity 30a. In another embodiment, matching server 20 may be configured t;o weigh the demographic 5 sixr..:Lla:r:ities and differen.ces based on the sex of user 14. The demographic data may 1nc1.ude, but is not l:Lmi.ted to, ager education, ethnic.i.ty t income' and l.ocat.ion' As an example only, assume that:. Harry and Sally are registered rners who have profiles in matching server 20. l .. 10 Harry has submitted a search request to matching server 20. While fulfiLli:ng this request, matchi11.g server 20 evaluates Sally's profile since her profile is in pool 30. As part of the evaluation, matching server 20 looks at the differences between Harry and Sally's stated age, l5 income, education, ethnici.ty, and location. In this example, Harry is:10 years older than Sa1.1.y, makes $10,000 more per year, and has a Master's degree while Sa.lly has a bachelor's degree. Even with these disparities, matching server 20 w.Ll.l give Sally's profile 20 a high score w·hich makes it more likely that Sally's profile will appea.r:- i.:n Harry's result list. However, i.f it was Sally who submitted the search, and matching st.=:::r:ver 20 was evaluating Harry's profile, a different:. score is possible. so, if i t were Sally who was 10 years 25 older, made $1.0, 000 more per year, and had a Master's degree whi.le Hax::r.y had a Bachelor's degree, matching server 20 would give a low score to Harry's profile, maki.ng it less likely that his profile would appeax· in Sally's result list. Matching server 20 may be 30 configured this way because emp.irical data has shown that these demographic differences do not have an equi.valent Ex. G-307 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.01.46 27 effect on the choices men and women make regarding matches. In another embodiment, mat.ch.i.ng server 20 may be configured to compa.re the locations of u.ser 14 and pool 5 entity 30a .iri. increments of ten miles. In yet another embodiment, matching server 20 ma.y be configured to score t.he location comparison in light of other fact.ors; as an example, ma.tching system 20 may be configured to return a score consistent with a 10 mile difference in location 1.0 even though there is a 50 mile difference between user 1.4 and. pool entity 30a if user 14 and pool entity 30a have the same income, education, and age. An advantage realized in several embodiments lS that it better approximates how a user evaluates entities. Entities 1.5 that live further away are generally less appealing to a user; but, users may still. be interested if the entity matches their preferences in other categories. As an ex.ample only, consider a registered user, Harry, who submits a search. request. While fuJ.fL"lling 20 th.ir-:3 request,. matching server 20 ex.amines Sally's profile in pool 30, and determines that the stated locations of. Harry's and profiles are 13 miles apart. Matching server 20 will g-ive Sally's profile a. score as if the distance between t.hem were only 1.0 miles. 25 However, in yet another example, Sally's profile may in.dicate that she lives 50 miles away from Harry. Yet, matching server 20 also notes that both Harry and Sally make $100, 000 per year, have Master's degrees, and that Harry and Sa11y are one year apart i.n age (Harry is 30 older) Given these similarities, matching server 20 will give a score to Sally's profile that is cons.istent with a 20 mile difference in location even though they Ex. G-308 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0146 28 are actually 50 miles apart. In this manner, matching server 20 takes:Lnto accO'unt empirical data that shows that people searching for matches who indicate that they want: to see matches who live close to them are still 5 willing to pursue a potential match that lives far away if the potent..ial match fits very cl.osel.y with the other search criteria. In another embodiment, matching server 20 may be configured to evaluate the age difference between user 14 10 and pool entity 30a usin.g ranges as 'i.vell as a sliding scale. By way of example only, matching se:rv(~r 20 may be configured t:o assign a high value to an age difference bet.ween 0 and -5, while assigning a lower value to an age difference between +2 and O. ~1 even lower value may be 15 assigned to an age diff:e:i:ence between -6 and -8. Even lower values would be assigned incrementally as the age difference increases outside of the ranges discussed. The higher the assigned value is, the more likely i t w.i1l be that pool enti.ty 30a will be in.eluded in result Li.st 20 3L Yet another embodiment may apply this combination of ranges and a slidi.ng scale but use di:f..f.erent values and ranges depending on the se:x of user 1,1. A.s an e:x:amp:l.e only, consider a situation in which a registered user, Harry, request<:; a searcl'1 to be 25 performed. While fulfilling t:hi.s request, matching server 20 evaluates Sally's profil.e, which was in pool 30. As part of the evaluat:Lon, matching server 20 compares the ages of Harry and Sally, and det:ermines that Harry is two years older than Sally; this determi:nation 30 .leads t.o matching .server 20 assigning, in this example, 50 point.s to Sally's profile. Matching server 20 may also be configured to assign 50 points to Sally's profile Ex. G-309 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076.533. OJ.46 29 had she been five years younger than Harry; but, if she had been up to two years older than Harry, matching server 20 may have been conf igur.ed to assign 40 points to her p:rof.i.le, Mat;ching server 20 may be further 5 configured to assign 30 points to Sally's profile if she wa.r-:i 6 to 8 years younger than Harry. However, if Sally were mo:n:1 l:han 8 years younger than Harry, matching server 20 may be configured to further decrease the number of points assigned to her profile: if she was .9 lO yea.rs younger, then 25 points; if she was 10 years younger, 20 points; if she was 11 years younger, 1.5 points; etc. The more points assigned to Sally's profile, the more likeJ.y it i.s that her profile will appear in Harry's result list. Thus, matching server 20 1.5 may be configured to assign a score based on age difference using a combination of ranges and a sliding scale. In another example, matching server 20 may assign scores differently if i t was Sally who was searching and 20 if i.t: ·;,-.;·as Harry's profile that was being evaluated. In this example, ma tchi.ng server. 2O may be configured to assign Harry's profile 50 points if he were between 1 and 5 years older than her. If he were 6 to 8 years older than her, matching server 20 may assign 45 points. If he 25 were g·reater than B years older than her, matching server 20 may assign points in the following fashi.on: if he was 9 years o1.der, 40 points would be assigned.; if he was 1.0 years older, 35 points would be assigned; etc. However, if he was up to two years younger than SaLly, matching 30 server 20 may a.ss:i.gn 50 points to his pro:f.Lte. If he were more than two years younger, matching server 20 may assign less points on a sliding scale: 45 points if he Ex. G-310 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATEN'I' APPLICP,,TION 076533. 01.46 30 were 3 years younger, 40 points:i.f. he were 4 years youn9er, etc. The more points assigned to Harry's profile, the more like i t is th.at his profile will appear:Ln Sall.y' s .1:-esuit list:. This example illustrates ho\•! .5 ma t.ching server 20 may be conf i.gured to take the sex of user 14 into account when scoring based on di.fferences. In various ernbodiment.s, matching server 20 may be configured to evaluate the attractiveness of an entity in 10 pool 30 through collected feedback from other users. In one embodiment, matching server 20 may present an entity to user 14, prompting user 14 to rate t.he attractiv·eness of the entity on a scale from 9. This range the advantage of having a midpoint. Matching se:r:ve:r 20 lS rnay further be configured to collect such responses a.nd store them; in one embodiment, matching server 20 may st.ore the data in memory 26, using a structure: such as database 26b. Matching server 20 may further be configured to compute the average of such responses for 20 the enti.ty, and store this number a.s vve 1.1 In va.rious ernbodi.ments, these values may be used in order t.o help in the matching process. Empirica1. data indicates that people are more like.ly to match 'Ni th people o<- similar attractiveness. 'I'hus, in various embod.i.ment.s, users 25 whose attractiveness rating are similar will be more l.i.k.ely to appear in each other's result list. Further, a 1..lSer may indicate that they only want profiles in their result l i s t whose average attractiveness ratin9 is higher than an indicated threshold. 30 As an example only, assume registered user, Harry, uses terminal lO, which. in this example is Harry's personal computer, and establishes communication with Ex. G-311 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICJ-\'I'ION 076533,0146 31 matching server 20. In this example, this communication occurs by Harry using a Web browser to access a Web page controlled by matching server 20. Sometime after visiting the Web page, matching server 20 may present: 5 Harry wi.th an. option to rate the physical attractiveness of other users registered with matching server 20. Us.ing display 12 and interface:J.6, Harry may ·view profiles of registered users and rank them on a scal.e o.f l 9 by entering the values us.i n9 interface 16; in this example, 1.0 .interface 16 comprises a mouse and/ or a keyboard. After submitting this rating, matching server 20 will associate it with the profile and store it. Matching server 20 will also allow other l:tsers to rate proi'::Ll.es, thereby collecting- a plurality of rankings for profiles. 15 Matchi.ng server 20 may use this data when trying to find matches for users. One example of this is that matching server 20 may allow user 14 to specify that he/she is searching for profi.les which have an average rating of 6 or above. In turn, matching server 20 may populate useiA' s 20:i.4 result list from the poo~l. only with profiles whose average:rating is at 6 or above. Another example of how matching server 20 may use this data .involves making it more likely that an. entity will appear in a user's result list ~f the entity and that user have a similar average 25 attractiveness rating. So, i.f a user has an average rating of 6, then an entity with an average rating of 5 may be more lik.ely to appear in the user's result list than an entity with an average rating of 2. In another example, assume that Harry is a 30 reg~etered user and has requested a search.. While fulfilling this request, matching server 20 evaluates Sally's profile. As part of this evaluation, matching Ex. G-312 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0:146 32 server 20 notices that Sal1.y' s profile contains feedback from other users ranking the attractiveness of Sally's profile. Matching server 20, in t.his example, averages that data; Sa:1.1.y' s prof.i."l.e average is 6. Matching server 5 20 may then examine Harry• s prof.i.1.e to determine a similar average, If Harry's profile h.as an average close to 6, i t will be morf.~ l.ikel:y that matching server 20 w:i.11 include Sally's profile in Harry's result list. If Harry's profile average is lower than 6, i t will be less 10 1.ikely that Sally's profile will be included in Harry's result list. It Harry's profile average is greater than 6, i t will be even less likely that Sally's profile will be included in Harry's resu1.t list. The more Harry's profile average deviates from that of Sally's, the less 1.5 likely it. will be that matching serve:i::- 20 will present Sally's profile in Harry's result l i s t. In some embodiments, matching server 20 may be configured to analyze prof:Lle information and received activity information to construct "pairs" which Link at 20 least two profil.es. These pairings may also be associated w.ith a. value that ascertains the quality of the pairing. For example, a pairing which results from one user viewing the profile of another user may be assig-xH.=.;d a value that is less than a pairing which 25 results frorn a first user viewing the profile o.f a second user when the second user has also viewed the f. irst: user's prof:i.1e. Mat.chin9 server 20 may llSB t~hese pairings in order to generate search results for entities within and outside of the pairing. Each member of the 30 pair may be used as a seed entity for generating search results for users in matching server 20. In various embodiments, an advantage may be realized as matching Ex. G-313 0 ATTOR:.~EY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0146 33 server 20 analyzes many of these pairs to develop dynamic results to users of the system, the results being potentially more relevant as matching server 20 leverages the interaction between. users and profiles to generate s search results. Pairs may be formed from a var.iety of user activity received by matching server 20. This a.ct.i.vi.ty may include: profile views, n:rutual profile views, one-way double blind communication, mutual double-blind lO communication, declining double blind communication, one way wink, mutual wink, expressing disint.erest in response; to receiving a wink, one way .favorite, and mutua.l favorite, Other suitable activity may also be received by matching server 20 and utilized as a basis for 15 generating pairs. For example, Harry may be a registered user vlho has expressed a positive preference for Sally. Matching server 20 may be configured to generat.e a pair wh.i.ch includes Ha:cry and Sally. Matching server 20 may uti.l:Lze 20 this pair \.\>"hen. px·o,.riding searcl1. res11lts to ot:her users,. Betty may have requested matches, an.d Betty may be similar to Sally.:Matchi.ng server 20 may present Harry in Betty's result l i s t as a result of the pairing between Harry and Sal J.y. Further, Jim may hav·e executed a search 25 and Jim may be sirn:\.lar t.o Harry. As a result of the pairing between .Sally and Harry, matching server 20 may present Sally in Jim's l~st of search results. In some embodiments, matching server 20 may be configured to encourage user 14 to interact with entities 30 .in pool 30. For example, matching server 20 may present a list of limited entities from pool 30 to user 14, but not present other en t i ties to user 1.4 unless user J-4 Ex. G-314 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.01.46 34 interacts with the already presented entities. Possible interaction with these entities may include viewing more information regarding the entity, expressing a positive or negative preference fo.:r: the entity, and choosing to 5 contact the entity. Other suitable forms of interaction may also be utilized. For examp1.e, matching server 20 may prompt the user with a question a.bout. the list of entities, such as asking whet:her or not the user .1.ikes the ent i t:y. Responses to such prompts rna:y include "yes," 10 "maybe," nr10, u "rern.ove r " and "remove other." 'I'he presented entit:i.es may be chosen using a vari.ety 0£ methods. Por example, the presented ent.ities may be chosen based on various scoring a:lgorithms as described above. In addition, presented entit.ies may be chosen 15 using predictive analysis, such as logi.st:i.cal regression. Other techniques may be used to determine the presented entities. For example, entities that have been presented previously may be excluded. As another example, entities that ha.ve been blocked by user. 14 may also be excluded. 20 In various embod.iment.s, a combination of t.hese techniques as well as others may be used to determine the limited nurnber of entities presented to user 14. For example, Harry may be a registered user of the matching syst.em, Matching server 20 may be configured to 25 present to Harry a l i s t of five entities that; Harry must Lnteract with. Once Ha:i:·ry has interacted with these entities, matching server 20 rnay present five more en t i tif:;s for Harr-y' to interact wi t.b.. Previously, Harry has blocked Sally, another reg:Lst.ered user of the system. 3o As a result, matching server 20 may exclude Sally from being presented to Harry in the list of five entiti(=;S, Further, Harry' has already interacted wi.th Betty, another Ex. G-315 0 A 'l'TORNEY' S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0146 35 registered user of the system: Harry sent a message to Betty utilizing matching· server 20. As a result, Betty will be excluded from being presented to Harry in the list of five entities. Ma.tching server 2o may then 5 ch.oose two of the five entities using scoring algorithms described above. For example, matching server 20 may choose Alice and Amy to be presented in the l i s t of five entities because Alice and l>~my have r.eci<.~i.ved high scores when their profiles were compared to Harry's profile. lO Matching server 20 may choose the remaining three ent:iti.es using predictiv~; analysis. According to this example, matching server 20 may use logistical regression to identii'.y Carla, Christi, and Camela as the other three entities to present t.o Harry. Thus, in this example, J.5 Harry is presented with a list of five entities by matching server 20. Mat.chi.ng server 20 may not present another set of five entities unt.i.l Harry has interacted with these five entities. Harry may interact with these entities in a va.riety of ways. For example, Harry may 20 send a message to Alice and send a "win.k" to Amy. In add.it:ion, Harry may choose to view more information about Carla's profile, but express a negative preference towards Chr:i.sti and Came la. After matching server 20 receives these types of interaction with t:he presented 25 five entities, another set. of five entities may be presented to Harry.:r.n t~his example, matching server 20 may further be configured to process the user interaction provided by Harry. For example, m.atching serve-r· 20 ma-y' utilize 30 Alice's prof:Cle as a seed entity to generate other possible entities to present to Harry since Harry sent a message to Al~ce. Thus, a benefit is from present.i.ng a Ex. G-316 0 A'I'TORNEY' S DOCKET PATE.NT APPLICATION 076533.01.46 36 the five entities to Harry in that the interaction between Harry and these entities may be utilized by matching server 20 to:-Jenerate other entities for matchin9 to Harry. This serves as an example of how 5 preferences may be identified based on user behavior. In FIGURE 4, one embodiment is dj_sclosed wherein matchi.ng server 20, with pool 30, may be configured to interact with another platform, su.ch as social networking p1.atform 50, containing a set 52 of users. User~;i 14 are lO comnru.nicat:Lve.ly coupled to matching sei""'vrer 20 and social net1Norking platform 50. Matching server 20 may further be configured to provide use-r·s of social networking platform so a service by whi.ch they may search for users withi.n set: 52 or within pool 30 using the algorithms and l5 processing of matching server 20. Matching server 20 may even further be configured t.o allow users of matching server 20 to search through pool 30 and set 52. Matching server 20 may be configured to parse the profiles of the enti.ties in set 52{ collecting data. and applying 20 algorithms. In another embodiment:, matching server 2O may be configured to allow users of social net.working platform 50 t:o i.nt:eract with matching server 20 using social:networking platform 50. This level of integrat:ion 25 provides the advantage of users not having to learn and sign up for a different platform. r..- ['\ Social networking pJ.atfonn -'<v f in one embodiment, may be a service which stores profiles of its users. This service may be further configured to provide access 30 t:o the stored profiles. In one embodirnent, social networking- platform 50 may also allow other services to Ex. G-317 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533. o:t46 37 interact with users of social networking- platform so throug-h social networking platform 50. In one embodiment, matching server 20 may be configured to co1.lect requests from users of sociaJ. 5 n.etworki.ng platform 50 and perform a. search through pool 30 and set 520 Matching server 20 ma.y further be configured to present the results of this search from within social networking platform 50. Matching sei-ver 20 may further be configured to present en.ti.ties in the lO search result:Erorn pool 30 as if they \v·ere entit.ies of set 52; in one embodiment, matching· server 20 may be configured to generate p:rofLtes of entities from pool 30 into set 52. 'I'hus, users of sociaJ. networking platform 50 may view all of the entities in the search result,:15 regardless of their source (either from pool 30 or set 52), within the envir.ori.mer1t of social networking platform 50. As an example only, consider two users: Harry, for whom matching st:<rver 20 has created a prof.i.le, and Sally, 20 who has a profile stored in social net.working p.la.tform 50. From within social net.working platform 50, ma.t.ching server 20 presents to Sally the ability to perform a search which Sally uses. 'I'he results of this search are presented to Sally within social networking platform 50. 25 In this example, Harry's profile is displayed to Sal.1.y as a search result a:I.ong with other entities from set 52 though Harry's profi.le was from pool 30. In this examp1.e, matching server 20 uses the algorithms discussed herein and searches through the profiles stored in pool 30 and 30 set 52. In order to display Harry's profile to Sally, matching server 20 creates a profile in set 52 l:tsi.ng the data stored in Harry's profile in pool 30. Sally is then Ex. G-318 0 b.TTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0146 38 able to interact with this newly created profile from within social networking pJ.atform 50 in the same manner as she is other entities in set 52. In anothe~r embodiment, matching server 20 may be 5 configured to allow its users to interact: with social networking platform 50 through matching server 20. In one embodiment, matching server 20 supplements pool 30 with set 52. In yet another embodiment, enti t.ies from set 52 appear as entities of pool 3 O to the user in the:i.r:LO list of search results. In one embodi.ment, matching server 20 may be confi.gured to generate profiles within pool 30 from entities of set 52; the system may be configured to do so through capabilities provided by social networking platform 50, such as an application:15 programming interface. As an example only, consider two users: Harry, whose profile is stored in matching server 20, and Sally, whose profile is stored in social networking platform 50. Harry submits a search:r:equest to mat.chi.ng server 20. 20:Matching server 20 may return result list 3:1. to Harry, v-1hich, .in this example, contai.ns a.n entity representing Sally's prof L1.e. Matching server 20 may accomplish this by creating profiles in pool 30 that correspond to the profiles found in set 52. Once these profiles ha.ve been 25 imported:into pool 30, matching server 20 may then search through pool 30. While doing so, matching server 20 applies t.he algorithms and scores discussed herein. Thus, in this example, matching server 20 has been configured to both search and apply scoring alg·orithms to 30 entities in pool 30 and set 52. B'urther, in one example, Harry is not able to distinguish that Sally's profile was originally stored in social networking plat.form 50. Ex. G-319 0 ATTO:RNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0146 39 Rat.her, matching server 20 presents Sally's profile in the same manner as other profiles stored in pool 30. Thus, .in thi.s example, Harry may use favorite button 34, view button 33, and contact button 35 when interacting 5 wi.th SaLl.y' s pro£:L1.e i.:n the same manner as described above. One advantage present in various embodimen.ts is that a user h<..'<S a wider pool of entities to search through, l'~nother advantage is that: a user does not have t:o sign up 1.0 with several platforms to search through the UJ.''.H.'-'rs on those platforms. FIGURE 5 is a flowchart illustrating one embodiment of how result list 3l may be generated. At step 62, matching server 20 generates pool 30, as described above. 15 JU:: step 64, matching server 20 applies a fil te1:- to pool 30, removin;;J certain entities; in various embodiments, this filter is based on user's 1.4 own sex and the sex user 14 desires to be matched with. At step 66, matching server 20 may be configured to appJ.y algo:cit:hms to pool 20 30 that will generate a pJ_ura.1.i.ty of scores 1:or each ~;ntity in pool 3 O. In one embodiment., these a1gori thms ma.y include analyzing the text of the profiles of the entities in pool 30 to generate a readability score, determining how attractive an entity oi: pool 30 is, or 25 measuring· how likely i t is that user 1.4 will con.ta.ct an entity of pool 30. At step 68, matching server 20 may be configured to col.lect all of the scores from step 66; in one embodiment, match.ing server 20 may use database 26b to store all of these scores. At step 70, matching 30 server 20 may be configured to apply an ordering algorithm which 'dill determine the order in. which entities in result l~st 31 are presented to user 14. In Ex. G-320 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0l46 40 one embodiment, this ordering algorithm is based, in part, on the scoring algorithms applied at step 66. The ordering algorithm assigns points to each entity and orders them .based on t:hese values, constructing result 5 List 31. An embod.i.ment of. this ordering algorithm is summarized in the following table: IJ'llllllllllJl~~lt'l~fllilli~il~l-lilll"lilll~f~ l l !~ ~:Y' ."' ·-·,·~-,.,.,_ J Readability score 1 point · +33554432 I:~~~~:~=~~~~:~~1-:~:s~~~- . . .;16777216 ------~------------------ --; the user t··~1a·t:·;;:;h····;.:e·s-~1·t:----;;1;:t:TFy·--·11;_;;; ....t;e-e;!1·-- ··-+·a·3-·3·a·6·c;3·····------·------··-----------··----···--·········------------- ··-----1 ! recommended by a friend 0£ l l the user. l -~~:~~~;~~t¥~~~t;~~~~:O:ilS ·r~~::.:~:~:-= =:· =::.·:= = .. . ·1 1 commonality with an entity l j ! user has expressed a ! ! LPE~:':,~-~-'.1?.~!?:~~-----~-?::i:'._____________ _.._._"'····"··--····-··'"'·--·----''-'L~........................................... --------·"""'"._______,____________________________ _ v __ 1--~;~-*-·-}~~~~---{:R~-----~--~~= i;:i-i-~·i;J~-~----·--· ·--:i-~-~--a·:r---··-----------------------------····-····· ..· --··-· · -·---··--·-------·-- [~;~f::~f}#t~:~~]-~~·::·:~*f:~:~::·: -~:·:_~:~: ~:<~ ~:~:: -~}t;:::::::::::::~::::::.:~:~_:·: _:-:::::::::::·::.:.: =- - -~- -·_-_::·:~:::::~:- 1 ! Both havE.~ the same diet j + 1J: .. . . i ·3-;.;~cii----Eav~----·the·-···;;a:m-e·--·-··-·-·------,·-··--------------··-r+"i'3107-2·--·····-·----·-··----,-···----------------··-------------·---------···::·--·-i preference for drinking .l ! -·· ...... - ............... .~ •same answer for "pets" l +65536 i .::~:::~:::::::~::::~:::1~:t::::~i~l~{~~:~~~~:::::TT~I~:~:::-.:~.:~.:~_:::~::::::::::::~::::::::::::::::::::::=:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 1 status I ·--5-;n:i:e---a:n:-s-1;;-ei:·---E0-x:·----,,·1:·c;rr;a:1~:c:-e 1;··-----------·1-·--+·5·i··2··---------~--------------·····---·--······---··-······----·--·------·-·--- ................................-••••••••• __________________________ ....... -. ................ ~ .............-------------- ••••••••-'••••"'••••"•••••·••••••••••••••••••••••'>••"""-"•'->-."""''''"""'''''v·""~""""""""••··-••••••••"••"'''••' Ex. G-321 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0146 41. t::~::;:;:::;:;;);;~::::z;·::;:k~~:~~,·i:~;::,;;;;:::J~:~::;~~~;~~~~i~6fd:~;;; j Same answer for smoking ! preferences rs·~me'""ar1;;·;;e~·· for ·sr.;·;;·~:·ts········· .................r~::9.............--~·--·--·------·---------·----..........; .l-.. ~-~~~=~~~~!i£~~-~~~~,-.-.·~--~~--~.¥-~.i.~~-:~::··············t··+·4·~~~?;~~~~~=-=--. . . . -.~-.-.: =~:-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.:-.:-.-.=:-_-_-_-_-_-_-.-.-.-.-~.: ·.:·.::·~::::J As an example only, consider a registered user, Harry, who desires to perform a search. Before processing the request, matching server 20 may ask Harry 5 what sex he is and what sex does he desire to be matched with; in this example, Harry responds that he is a male seeking a female. After doi.ng so, ma.tching ser·ver 20 will generate pool 30 as described above. Next, matching server 20 'Nil.l apply a filter to remove certain entities:10 from pool 30. In this example, all maler1 will be removed from pool 30 since Harry is seeking a female. Further, all females seeking females will be removed from pool 30 since Harry i.s a male. In other examples, other entities that are removed from pool 30 include entities that Harry:LS ha.a expressed a negative preference for before, or entities that have expressed a negative preference for Harry. After pool 30 has been filtered, matching server 20 appli.es a variety of scoring algorithms to the entities remaining i.n pool 30. These algorithms may 20 account for various comparisons such as those based on reada.bi.1.i ty, likelihood to contact, fate, and key·vvords descri.bed above, Matching ser~-.rer 20 will then tabulate these scores, storing them, in this example, in database 26b. Matching server 20 will then determine what order 25 these entities a.re presented tc Harry by applying an ordering algorithm. Here, matching server 20 assigns one ordering score to each entity by examining the results of Ex. G-322 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0146 42 the scoring algo:r:ithrns. After doing so, matching server will present result l i s t 3l to Harry, where the order of the entiti.es that appear in the result list is based on the orderin9 algorithm. In this example, it is possible 5 for result list 31 to change. Consider another user, Sally, who appears in Harry's result list. If Ha:x:ry decides to add her .into a separate l.ist~ by using favorite button 34, Sally will be removed from result: list 31 (as described above). However, Sally will also become a seecl 10 entity from which entities may be added to pool 30 (as described above) . Hence, matching server 20 will update the poc>l, apply the filters, apply the scoring algorithms, tabulate the results, apply the orde:r:ing algorithm, and update result list 3l. As another l5 example, an entity may update their profile which can change result list 31. For example, assume Sally's profile had an ordering algorithm score that placed her within the top 20 entities in result l i s t 31. Sally then changes her profile which results in key'..1ords that match 20 Harry's profile being added to her profile. Matching server 20 will then update her scori.ng algorithms. In this examr>le, the change in SaJ.ly' s profile and resulting increase in keyword matches with Harry's p:x:of:lle significantly increased her score. This was then 25 reflected in the ordering algorithm as it was also applied to the updated profile. Afterwards, Sally's profile is now placed vd.thin th.e top 5 entities in result l i s t 31. In some embodiments, matching server 20 may be 30 configured to receive required characteristics from user 1.4 regardin9 a match. User 14 may be allowed to specify such restrictions based upon any number of Ex. G-323 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533,0146 43 characteristics, inc'l.uding those described herein. For example, matching server 20 may allow user 14 to specify that entities that indicate they have children should not be displayed. In another example, user 1·1: may specify 5 that only entities between the ages of 20 and 30 should be present. in result list 31. In some embodiments, matching server 20 may impJ.ement these restrictions in step 64 of FIGURE 5. In other embodiments, howevE.~r, matching server 20 ma.y refuse to apply these restrictions lO to certain entities based on t:he characteristics of the entities. Any number of characterist.:i.cs, including· those described herein, may form the basis upon which matching server 20 decides not to apply the restrictions submitted by user l4. As an example on1.y, matching- ser,rer 20 may 15 .ignore the restrictions if the entity has a high enough attractiveness rating. In another example, though user 14 has requested that no profiles which are located more than 50 mi.Tes away should be present in result. 1 i st 31, matching server 20 may incl.ude such profiles because 20 those profiles have over 5 matching keywords, a high attractiveness rating, and have specified the same life goa.~ls as user 1<1. Thus, in some embodiments, matching server 20 may refuse t:o apply restrictions submitted by user 14 based on any combination of characteristics or 25 algorithms. An advantage present in many embodiment~::.; is that through taking i.nto account various factors when scoring potential matches and using only very few strict filters, a large amount of result entities may be returned to the 30 user. A further advantage is that the ordering algorithm will put the most relevant search results first, saving the user time. Ex. G-324 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533,0146 44 FIGURES 6-9 depict embodiments of a user interface presented to users of the matching system discussed above wi t.h respect to FIGURES l and 4. According to some embodiments, users 14 interact with matching sei-ver 20 5 through interface 16 presented by terminal 1.0. In addition to the embodiments of interface 16 described above in re lat. i.on to FIGURE 1A, .interface 1.6 may also comprise a touch screen i.nt:erface operable to detect and receive touch input such as a tap or a swiping gesture. 10 In scnne embodiments; matching· server 20 may import profiles from other social networking systems. This lEnTel of integration provides the advantage of users only having to update their proti le information in one place. For exampl.e, when user 1A updates his profile within l5 social networking platform 50, matching server 20 is also able to access the updated profile information. In some embodiments, matching server 20 may fu:t·ther be configured, as part of the user registration process, to link to a user's existing profile within social 20 networking pJ.a.tfo.r..·m 50. Mate hi ng· server 2O may be configured to parse the profiles of the users in set 52, collecting data and applying algorithms. For G.~xample, matching server 20 may use explicit signals from social networking platform 50 such as common friends, 25 common interests, common network, location, gender, sexuality, or age to evaluate potent.i.al matches between users 14. Matching server 20 may also use implicit sig·nals such as for whom a user 14 expresses approval and disapp.r:ov-al. Implicit signals may also include facial 30 recognition algorithms to detect ethnicity, hair color 1 eye color, etc., of profi 1es that user 1.4 has expressed interest in. Ex. G-325 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0146 45 In particular embodiments, matching server 20 may have u.sers l4 to l.:i.nk their user profiles to an existing profile within social network.i.ng p1.atform 50. Matching server 20 may be configured to generate and add. profiles 5 to user profiJ.e poo1. 30 from;;;ntities of set 52; the system may be configured to do so t.hrough capab:Lliti.es provided by social networking platform 50, such as an application programming interface. One advantage of linking is that matching server 20 can use the 10 authenticati.on features provided b'y social networking platfOl.'lll 50. For example, creating a user profile on matching server 20 containing false information. becomes harder when the information must come i':rom another ver~fiable and peer monitored source such as social 15 networking platform 50. In some embodiments, matching server 20 may allow a user J.4 to propose a match between two of his connections within soc.ia.J. network.ing platform 50. For example, Harry rnay be friends w.i.th both Bob and Sally within soci.aJ. 20 networl\:ing platform 50. Harry beli.;;;ves Bob and Sa.J.ly are a good mat.ch and therefore instructs matching server 20 to create a match between the two users in user profile pool 30. Once matched, matching server 20 allows Harry and Sally to communicate with each other. 25 In some embodiments, matching server 20 may be conf.igured to apply a relevance algorithrn which determines t:he content and order in which mat.chin9 server 20 di.splays potential matches to user 1,i. A relevance algorithm may be based on both explicit and implicit 30 signals from user 14. Explicit signals include information entered by user 14 as part of its user p:rofiJ.e, such as height, weight, age, location, income, Ex. G-326 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0146 46 and ethnicity. Explicit signals may also include information. about the characteristics user 14 is seeking in a match, such as gender, hair color, eye color, or occupati.on. Explicit signals may also be entered by user 5 14 as part of a search request. For exampl.e, user 14 may request matching server 20 l.im:Lt the pool of potential matches t.:o those users with.in a fixed geographic region. Matching server 2o is operable to compare gf..~ographic positions associated with the plurality of user profiles lO in user profile pool 30 with a geographic position associated with user 14. Explicit signals may be imported from a social networking platform 50, such as the number of shared entities in a social graph of: user 14. Implicit signals may be based on the behavior of user 15 14 either within system 1.00 or other social networking platforms 50. F'or example,:i.f user 14 has expressed disapproval of a user profile in the past., matching server 20 may no longer present the disapproved of user profile to user 14 in future searches. In va.r.:i.ous 20 embodiments, matching server 20 may be configured to eva1.ua.te the attractiveness of a. user:Ln user profile pool 30 through collected feedback from other users. For example, matching server 20 may rank a user profile that. receives more likes as more r{:';lE.-)vant than a user profile 25 t.:hat:. receives fewer likes. I:n particular embodiments, mat:chi.:ng server 20 may assign. a h:Lgher rel•.:..rvance to a user profile if the other user has previously expressed a preference for user 14. As an example, user Harry may have previously expressed a preference .for user Sally. 30 If Sal.ly requests a set of user profiles from matching· server 20, and Harry's user profile is included in the set, matching server 20 may assign Harry's user profile a Ex. G-327 0 l\.TTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT l'i.PPI,ICATION 076533. Ol,;t6 47 higher relevance based on his expression of preference for Sally. This can result in Harry 1 s profile being presented to Sally sooner than otherwise would have occurred. This may be advantageous i.n that it can 5 increase the chances of a rnatch wit.hout compromising a 1.:1.ser' s feelings cd" pri·vacy when expressing preferences for potential. matches. In some embodiments, matching server 20 may be configured to use the fate characteristics as a metric in the relevance algorithm. 1.0 In some embodiments, terminal:to is operable to determine its own geographic location by a global positioning satellite navigational systemo Termina1 1.0 rnay also determine its own geographic location using eel lphone ... based triangulation techniques, Wi-Fi based 1.5 pos~tioning system, Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) system, or net1,qork addresses assigned by a service provider. FI GORE 6 shows one embodiment of system 100 disp1.aying to a user the p:r.of:i.1.e information of a second 20 user. Matching server 2O may be configured to search through i.t:s plurality of profiles and present suggested matches to user 14. In FIGURE 6, one embodiment of t:;his presentation is depicted as occurring through the display of terminal 10. In this embodiment., a plurality of user 25 prof. iles .is presented to user 14. UBing terminal 10, user l4 may request that matching server 20 px:esent a subset of users from user profile pool 30 based on spec if ied search para.meters. The display may show an image of a suggested user and one or more aspects o.f' t:he 30 suggested user's prof:i.1.e information. In some embodiments, the combination of image and one or more aspects of profile information is displayed as "card" 88 Ex. G-328 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.01.46 48 representing the suggested user. A set of suggested users may be displayed as stack of cards 88. User l4 may view information regarding one suggested user at a time or more than one of the suggested users at a time. User 5 14 may be p:r:esented with a summary of information regarding a suggested user. The summary may incJ_ude one or mo:r:e of: a pictu.re, an .icon, name, location i.nforma.tion, gender, physical attributes, hobbies, or other profile information. 1.0 In some embodimenti:>, t~erminal 10 may also display "informati.on" button 84 which allows user 14 to request matching 20 to retrieve and display more information about the presented user from user profile pool 30. In addition, user 14 may express approval or 15 disapproval for a presented user. Expressi.ng approval or d:i.sa.pproval can be accomplished through various methods. For example, terminal 10 may display "1.ike" button 86 (represented by a green heart icon) and "dislike" button 82 (represented by a red "X" icon) . Pressing like butt.on 20 86 indicates to matching server 20 that user:J.4 approves 0£· and is interested in communicat:i.on with the presented user. Pressing dislike button 82 ind~cates that user 14 disapproves of a.nd does not want to commun.i.cate wit.h the presented user. The approval preference of user 1..:1 is 25 anonymous in that mat.ching S{'.:rver 20 does not .., ' l.n"'-orrn users 14 whet.her other users have expressed approval or disapproval for th.em. As an example, consider two registe:red users, Harry and Sally, both of whom have profiles stored in matching 30 server 20. Harry is at a restaurant and requests matching server 20 to present him users within a one·-·mile radiu:o.: of his location. Matching server 20 compares a Ex. G-329 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PJ\.TENT APPLICATION 076533. O:l.46 49 geographic position associ.a.ted with Sally with a geographic position associated with Harry. If Sally is currentl.y within the one-mile radius of Harry a:nd matching server 20 determines her profile information 5 matches Harry's preferences, matching server 20 will prest=n1t: Harry one or more aspects of Sally's profile information. If other users also meet the search criteria, matching server 20 will present one or more aspects of those users' pro.file information as well. 10 Harry may request more information about Sally by pressing informati.on butt.on 84. Harry may al.so indicate his preference to communicate directly wit.h Sal.ly selecting like button 86. In another example, Harry may expand his search to a twenty-five mile radius to meet 15 pe.ople:in his town, not just his immediate v:i.cinity. FIGURES 7 and 8 are diagrams of embodiments of the display:from FIGURE 6 showing- the effect of a left swipe gesture (FIGURE 7} and the effect of a right swipe gesture (FIGURE 8} . Tn one embodiment, users 14 may 2O navi.ga.t<'.~ th.roug-h the set of presented users by swiping through stack of cards 8 8, Users 1A may also ~:;xpress approval of a presented user by performing a right r-:iwipe gesture or express disapproval by performing a left sw.1..pe gesture. In some embodiments, user 14 performs a swiping 25 gesture by moving a finger o:r other suitable object across a screen of terminal 10. Other suitable gestures or manners of interacting with terminal lO may be used (e.g., tapping on portions of a screen of terminal 10). In some embodiments, matchin;;J server 20 creates a 30 match between two users:L4 aft:er both users 14 have expressed a preference for each other• s profiles using like button 86 or the swiping gesture associated with Ex. G-330 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKE'I' PATENT l-i.PPLICATION 076533.0145 50 like button 86. When matching server 20 c:reates a match, i t may also provide the matched users with the ability to contact each other through a contact button. In some embodiments, when a match is created, matching server 20 5 ma.y immediately (or soon therea:fter) present an option to users 14 that have been mat:;ched to engage .in a. communication session (e.g., a ch.at~, an SMS messa<:-.fe, an e-·ma:Ll., a telephone call, a voice commun:i.ca.t:i.on session. a video communication session) . This may be don~= in lO response. to a first \.lS<'lr 14 expressing a preference for. a second user 14 that has a.1ready expressed a preference for the first user 14. FIGUH.E 9 sb.ows one embodiment of matching system 100 displaying a match of a first user and a second user, in l5 accordance with a particular embodiment. Matching server. 20 may provide first user. 14 and second user 14 with each other's contact: information such as a telephone number or an e-ma.i.l address. Matching server 20 may also provide both first and second users 14 with a way to d.irectly 20 contact the other, such as sending a message or prov.id:Lng voJce or vi.deo communication bet.ween the first and second user. In some embodiments, direct comrm.i.ni.cat,ion may be initiated by pressing "Send a:Message" button 92. Alternatively, a user may choose to continue browsing the 25 set of presented users by pressing "Keep Playing" button 94. For example, user Harry may indicate a preference to communicate di.rectl·.:t with user Sal.ly by selecting like button 86. At this point, Sally is not aware that Harry:3 0 expressed a preference for her. If Sal1.y also requests matching server 20 present her with a set of possible matches, Harry may appear in her set. Sally may select Ex. G-331 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLlCATION 076533.0146 Sl like button 86 (or perform an associated swiping gesture) when viewing Harry• s profile. Matching server 20 may then notify both Ha.r.ry and Sally that a match occurred, At t;his point, both Harry and Sa..lly are made aware that 5 they each ex.pressed approval of each other's profile. Matching server 20 then enab1es Harry and Sa.Lly to directly communicate with each other (e.g., through a private chat interface) . In some embodiments, one advantage of a system 10 disclosing preferences of profiles to users when mutual appx.·oval has occurred is that a user can feel more secure in their privacy knowing that their preferences will be disclosed to those t;hat have expressed a preference for that user. As an example, a user can avoid embarrassment 15 i:E their expression of pre:Eerence for a profile was not reciprocated. This may lead to users more actively express.i.ng the.ir preferences. Such in.creased activity can be used by the matching system to generate more potential matches or better rankings of potential 20 matches. In some embodiments, mat.ching server 20 may be configured to allow direct communi.cation between users '""hen there has been a mutual expression of preference. Thi.s may be advantageous because users can avoid browsing, deleting, or responding to un'"''anted messages. 25 FIGURE 1.0 is a flowchart depicting a method for enabling communication between two users of the matching system of FIGURE 1. based on a mutual expressi.on o.f app~oval, in accordance with a particular embodiment. At step 1002, in some embodiments, matching server 30 20 ger1erates a set of user profiles ir1:t."esponse to a request for matching from a first user 14. At step 1004, matching server 20 presents the set of i.1ser profiles to Ex. G-332 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.01.46 52 first user 1.4. Matching server 20 determines the contents and ordering of the set of users profiles by using, e.g., the relevance algorithms described above in the discussion of FIGURE 4. For example, matching server 5 20 ma.y on:Ly include user profiles whc>se contents indicate location within a specified geographical radius and order. the prer-:ientation o.f those user profiles based on the number of mutual fr.iends:i.n common with first user 14. l',,,t step 1.006, in some embodiments, matching s~nver 1.0 20 receives an indication of the preference of:first user 1.4 regarding a presented user profile. Matching server 20 determines if ti:r:st use·r 14 expresses approval or disapproval of the presented user profile at step 1008. If first user 14 disapproves of the presented user 1.5 profile then a match is not made and, at step 101.6, matchi.ng server 20 will not allow communication between the two users. If first user 14 expresses approval for the presented user profile at; sLep 1008, t.hen matching server 20 wi.lJ. check i f second user 1..a represented by the 20 presented user profile has already expressed a. preference .tor first usf.~r 14 at seep J..01.0. If matching server 20 detects a mutua1. expression of approval then a match is made between first and second users:J..4. Then, at step 1012, matching ser',rer 20 allows private communications 25 between first a:nd second users 14. If a mutual expression of approval is not detected at step 101.0, then matching serve·r 20 stores the preference of first user 1.4 regarding the presented user profile for future comparison and con.ti.nu.es to step 1016 where private 30 communications are not yet a1.lowed. FIGURE 11. is a flowchart depicting a method for enabling communication between two users of the matching· Ex. G-333 0 _z:..,_ TTORNEY' S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0146 53 system. of FIGURE 1 based on a matching proposal suggested by a user, in accordance with a particular embodiment. 1\t step ll02, matching server 20 receives interactions from first user 14. In.tera.cti.ons from first user 14 may:;; include identification of user profi.Jes for two other users l4.. For examplE'~, Harry is connected. to both Bob and Sa.1.ly w.ith:Ln social networking platform 50. Harry believes Bob and Sally are a. good ma.tch for each other and generates a matching proposal requesting matching 10 server 20 to create a match between Bob and Sally. At step 1.104,:Ln some embodiments, matching server 20 validates the suggested matching proposal between second and third users 14. For examp.le, mat.ching server 20 verifies that Bob's profile indicates that he wants t:o:LS be matched wi.th a woman, and Sally's profile indicates that she wants to be matched wit:.h a man. Matching server 20 may also verify that Sally has not previously expressed disapproval for Bob. If matching server 20 determines the su9gested matching proposal is valid, 20 matching 20 creates the match and a.llows communication between the users 14 suggested t.o be matched at step 1106. If matching- server 20 de.termi.nes the sug·gest:ed matching proposal is not Vctlid, matching server 20 do~'.!S not create a mat.ch and does not allow 25 communica.t::1.on between second and third users 14 at step llOB. In some embodirnent.:s, step 1104 may not. be perfo:rmed. For example, if a matching proposal is sugg·ested, then matching server 20 may perform step 1106 with respect.: to the users suggested to be matched. 30 FIGURES 12A-D depict embodiments of a l.:tser interface. In some embodiments, the ~nter£ace allows user 14 of terminal 10 to enable cornmun.i.cati.on between Ex. G-334 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET Pl'"'-TENT APPLICl\TION 076533.0146 54 other users 14 by suggesting a matching proposal to matching server 20. F'IGORE l2A illustrates one embodiment of an inter.face for proposing a match bet.ween two users. The 5 interface is divided into three sections: connection list area 1.202, search area 1204, <:.<.nd suggestion area 1206. Connection list area 1202 displays a. set of connections user 1A has with other users of, e. g,, system 100 of FIGURE J_. Connections may be based on prior matches 10 created by matching server Connections may also be imported from another socia.1 networking platform 50. Search area 1204 enables user 14 to search for particular connections v.;rit:.hin system 100. In some embodiments, the search may be limited t:.o just the connections displayed l5 in connection list area. 1202. Suggestion area 1206 displays the connections that user 1.4 may ·use to form a suggested match. FIGURE 1.2B illustrates suggestion area 1206 displaying a first selected user {i.e., "Jonathan Smithn) 20 of a proposed ma.tch between two users~ User 1.4 identifies the first selected user through a set of interactions with connection l i s t area 1202, search area 1.204, and suggestion area 1206. For example, user 14 rnay locate a connection in connection list area 1.202 by 25 typin.9 a ·u.se:r handle i.n search area 1.204. User 1','I: may then add the connection to suggest:.ion area 1.206. In some embodim0:nts 1 user 14 may drag the connection from connection list. area 1202 to suggestion area 1206, FTGURE:L2C illustrates suggest.ion area 1206 30 displaying a proposed match between two suggested users (i.e., "Jonathan Smi.th" and "Mary Maj or") F'or example, user 14 may ~Locate a second connection in connect list Ex. G-335 0 ATTORNEY' S DOCKE'l' PATENT APPLIC~7:;.TION 076533.0146 55 area 1202 that user 14 believes is a match for the first connection. User 14 may add the second connection to suggestion area 1206. When both connections are added to sug~1estion area 1206, matching server 20 may create a 5 match between the two users and a1.l.ow commun.i.cation between them. FIGURE 12D illustrates an example cornmuni.cation interface between users of the matching system. User 14 .is presented with chat box 1208 for each of the matches 1.0 that exist for user 1.4. Users 14 may comrnuni.cate with each other through chat box 1208. In some embodiments, users 14 may communicate through SMS messa9es, e-mail, telephone calls,. online voice communication sessions, and/or video communication sessions" l5 Modifications, additions, or omi.ssions may be made to the methods described herein (such as those described above with respect to F'IGURES 5, J.O and 11.) without departing from the scope of the disclosure. For example, the steps may be combined, modified, or deleted where 20 appropriate, and additional steps may be added. Additionally, the steps ma.y be performed in any suitable order wit:.hout departing from the scope of the present disclosure. Although several. embodiments have been illustrat{'!d 25 and described in detail, it will be recognized that substi.t.uti.ons and alterations are possible without departing from the spirit and scope of the appended claims. Ex. G-336 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0146 56:l.. A method for profile matching, comprising: receivj_ng a pJ.ura1ity of user profiles f each user 5 profile comprising traits of a respective user; receiving a preference indication. for a first user profil.e of the pJ.u.ra.J.ity of user profil.es; determining a potential match user profile of the plurality of user profiles based on the preference 10 indication for the first user profile; and presenting the potential match user profile to a second user. 2. The method of Claim 1, wherein receiving a 15 preference indication for a first user profile comprises receiving from a third ·user a recommendation of the first user profile for the second user. 3. The. method of CJ.aim:L, wherein rece.iving a 20 pr.·e.:ferer1ce in(iic~at.ion fcJr a fi:t"'St. l.lse.:t. . p:t~of.ile comprises receiv.ing from the secon.d user a preference indication for the first. user profile. The method of Claim l, further comprising 25 prompting a use.r to submit a preference indication for the first user prof~1e. 5. The method of Claim 1, wherein receiving a preference indication .for a .first: user profile comprises 30 recaiving from the second user a request for communication with a first user associated with the first user profile. Ex. G-337 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKE'I' PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0146 57 6. The method of Claim 1, further comprising: determining a score 0£ a third user profile of. the p1.u:r:ali ty of user profiles as a potential match for the 5 second user; and altering the score of the third user profile based on the preference indication for the first user pro.file. 7. The method of Claim 1, wherein determining a 10 potential match user profile based on the preference indication for the first user profile comprises determining a potential match user profile based on identified commonality between the potential match user profile and the first user profile. 15 Ex. G-338 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT hPPLICATION 076533.0146 58 8. A method for profile matching, comprising: receiving a pTurali ty of user profiles, each user profile comprising traits of a. respective user; receiving a request for matches from a first user, 5 the first user associated with a first user profile; scoring the p1urali.ty of user profiles for potent:Lal matching with the f i.rst. user based on comparisons of the plurality of user profiles with the f.i.rst: user profile; .identifying a second user prof i1e of the pl u.r.al:i. t.:y 10 of user profiles as a pot:ential match for the first user based on the scoring; identifying commonality bet.ween a third user profile of. the plurality of user profiles and the second user profile; and 15 presenting to the i:'i.rst user the third user profile as a potential match for the first user. 9. The method of Claim 8, wherein scoring the p1.ura1.ity use:r: profiles for potential matching w.ith 20 the first user based on compa.risons of the plura.J.it.y of 1.Iser profiles witb. the first user profile comprises: generating readability scores for each 0£ the p.lu.ra.Lity of user profiles and tl-i.e first user p:r:ofile; and 25 comparing the rf.~ada.bility scores for each of the plurality of user profiles with the readability score for Lhe first user profile. Ex. G-339 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533 "OJ.46 59 10. The method of Claim 8, wherein scoring the plurality of user profiles f:or potential matching with the first user based on a comparison of t:he plurality of user prof.i.l.es with the first user profile comprises 5 scoring based on .fate char:act:eristics based on comparisons 0£ the plurality of u.ser prof.i.les with the first user profile. ll. The method o:E Cl.a.:Lm 8, wherein scoring the J_O plur«..'1.lity of user profiles for potential matching with the £irst: user based on comparisons of the plurality of user profiles with the first user profile comprises~ generating scores based on comparisons of the plurality of user profiles with a plurality of user:15 preferences of the first user profile; and reducing a scoring impact of a difference between at least one user preference of the plurality of user preferences of the first user profile and a user profile of the plurality of user profiles based on an age 20 preference. Ex. G-340 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0146 60 12. The method of Claim 8, wherein scoring the plurality of user profiles for potent:i.al matching with the first user based on comparisons of the plu:r.a1. .it.y of user pi..-ofi.les \"lith the first: user profile con1prises: 5 generating scores based on comparisons of the plurality of user profiles with a plurality of user preferences of the first user profile; and reducing a scoring impact of a d.ifference between at least one user preference of the plurality of user TO preferences of the first user profile and a user profile of t:.he plurality of user profiles based on a location preference. 13. The method of Claim 8, wherein scoring the 15 plurality of user profiles for potentia.1 matching with the first user based on comparisons of the plurality of user profiles with the first user profile comprises: generating a score of a fourth user profile of the plurality of user pro£iJ.es for potential matching 20 1.·1ith tb.e first. user based on a comparison of the fourth user prof.i1.e wit.h the first user profile; a.n.d modifying the score of the fourth user profile for potential matching with the first user based on receiving selections of the fourth user profile. 25 14. The method c>f Claim 8, wherein scoring the plurality of user profiles:for potential mat.ching with the first user comprises det.ermining an attractiveness rating of at least one user profile of the plural~ty of 30 use:r: profiles by at least analyzing a frequency of selections of the at least one user profile. Ex. G-341 0 A'rTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLIC~Z\TION 076533.0146 61 1.5. A. system for prof.il.e matching, comprising: an interface operable to: receive a plurality of user profiles, each user profile comprising traits of a respective user; and 5 receive a preference indication for a first user profile of the plurality of user profiles; a processor coupled to the interface and operable t.o determine a potential match ·user profile of the pluralit"y of user: prof:U.es based on the preference indication for 10 the first user profile; and the interface further operable to present the potential rnatch user profile to a second ·user. l6. The system of Claim 15, wherein an interface:15 operable to receive a preference indication for a first user profile comprises an interface operable to receive from a thi.rd user a recommendation of the first user profile for the second user. 20 1.7. The system of Cl.aim 15, wherein an i.nter:f.ace operable to receive a preference indication for a first user profile comprises an interface operable to receive from the second user <::<. preference indication for the first user profile. 25 18. The system of Claim 15, wherein. the processor is further operable to prompt a user to submit a preference indication for the first user profile. Ex. G-342 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076.533.0l46 62 19. The system of Claim 1.5, v/hered.n an interface operable to receive a preference indication for a first user profile comprises an .interface operable to receive from the second user a request for communication with a 5 first user assoc1ated with the first user profile. 20. The system of CI.aim J.5, where:Ln the:r;:rrocessor is further operable to: determine a score of a third user profile of the 10 plurality of user profiles as a potential match for the second user; and alter the score of the third user profile based on the preference indication for the first user profile. J.5 21. The system of Claim 15, wherein a processor operable to determine a potent:i.a:l match user profile based on the preference indication for the first user profile comprises a processor operable to determine a potential match u.ser profile based on ident.ified 20 commonality between the potential match user profile and the first user profile. Ex. G-343 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0246 63 22 c A system for prc.1file n1atching ! cornpx·isir1g: an interface operable to: receive a plurality of user profiles, each user profile compri.s.ing traits of a respective user; and 5 receive a request for matches from a first user, the fi.rst user associated with a first user profile; a processor coup:l.ed to the interface and operable to: lO score the plurality of user profiles for potenLia1 matching with l:he fi.rst user based on comparisons of the p1:ura1.ity of user profiles with the first user profile; identify a second user profile of the plurality 1~ of user profiles as a potential match for the first user based on the scori.ng; and identify commonality between a third user profile of the plurality of user profiles and the second user profile; and 20 the interface further operable to present to the first user tb.e third user profile as a potential matc11 for the first user. Ex. G-344 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATEN'l' APPLICATION 076533. 01A:6:MATCHING PROCESS SYSTEM AND ME'THOD .f.>..BSTRACT ------------------------------- A method for profile matching includes receiving a 5 plurality of user prof:i.les, ea.ch user profile comprising traits of a respective user. The method includes receiving a preference indication for a first user profile of the plurality 0£ user profiles. The method also includes determining a potential match user profile 10 of the plurality of user profiles based on the preference indication for the first user profile. 'l'he method also includes presenting the potential match user profile to a second user. Ex. G-345 0 Title: Matching Process System d Method an Inventors: Sean Rad et al. Atty. Dkt. No. 076533.0150 1/Il 14 100 r' MATCHING SEF!VER 20 0 0 20. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ._. . . . .{!... . .____. . . . . . . . . . -. ., 10 .;~:::::::::::~::.....::::-~~ c~~ .F7<Y. JB .fc"P~ . ·'~·28 "o. FIG. JC Ex. G-346 0 Title: Matching Process System and Method Inventors: Sean Rad et al. Atty. Dkt. No. 076533.0150 2111 · - - ··-· . .:~ ~ ... - .----·---~- .. "~:·····~t"""""·--.,. .....................:-................,...,.......:-.. ~................... NAME PROPERTY 1 ' PROPEHTY 2 o o o ············.·················"······--·----~.j-""""""""""""'""'- """"""···················· ~- Ir Jane Doe. f 30a j Jane Roe~r30b 301· .J~n~ Boe ...r 30c 0 0 <:.,Jarn, Loe -......._ d 30 ... Jane Snoe--....•. 308 () 0 0 FIG. JD ________ •.. .,- SEARCH RESULTS ~"""""~--············-- ................................. _. -~·.··························· 31 a ·["~';;',~'.'.':.'1>" .. 33 ····""' / .. 34 I i. Jane Doe~·· !~ (~)··. 31 l 2. Jane Roe/· 3i b [y~~]_,,.-33 ~ . 3. Jane Boe-.., ..... ·• " '·,j 1c ii'"~"-~' ~ View ~ . . •.• '· 33 " Q See More F'.IG. JE ••••••••••••••·•••••••••••"•"'-~-·--·•··'~'"·""'""''""'"°""""""""""••••"''"--·-·-"""""""'"w••••••.••""""""" . ., . . . .i,1'.::J~:A' "" .·,Jane Doe /1(~"i;i <<!)\\ .·· '["""~'·························.w.•.•.w _....35, /(ll.A'UJl\ . i Contact. ··· '" . .\)·A·~., ~.·:.wt\.frf.·.':d:(. \.. I,~·· \ ·n. .• l. . ~ t. . J._\A. Born: i0/01/75:.l.......... 1 Hometown: Dallas, 1X Likes: C!1ocolate, rollerb!ading Dislikes: Body odor. arrogance, foott)al! FICi. 1.F Ex. G-347 0 Title: Matching Process System and Method Inventors: Sean Rad et al. Atty. Dkt. No. 076533.0150 3/11 IrFIG. 2 H/\F1RY'S SEARCH RESULTS,..~ i2b"" I ' FIG. 3 Ex. G-348 0 Title: Matching Process System and Method Inventors: Sean Rad et al. Atty. Dkt. No. 076533.0150 4/11 20 50 \, ._..,........::\;..._.,._..... ' 30 52 .....~"".:]-, [J [ . Ex. G-349 0 Title: Matching Process System and Method Inventors: Sean Rad et al. Atty. Dkt. No. 076533.0150 5/11 .,.,... i 0 = -~""" l (~)(}) (~ .FlGo 6 FlCl. 7 ·.· /-10 = --~--····~ ..................... tinder tinder It's a match! ' ·'-'·"88 FIG. 8 .F::!G. 9 Ex. G-350 0 Title: Matching Process System and Method Inventors: Sean Rad et al. Atty. Dkt. No. 076533.0150 6/11,.,.,,-1002. GENERATE USER POOL i /.,,.., 1004 DISPLAY USER POOL i r" 1006 RECEIVE USER PREFERENCE t .----~...w.·~~ 1014 STORE FIRST ALLOW COMMUNICATION USER'S PREFERENCE ~ ......."..............................................t..--1016 ........................ DO NOT ALLOW COMMUNICATION FIG. 10 Ex. G-351 0 Title: Matching Process System and Method Inventors: Sean Rad et al. Atty. Dkt. No. 076533.0150 7/11 ("'°'1102 RECEIVE PAIR OF USER IDENTIFIERS ___,.,..,,.-·'""',,.._""'-<,....-. 11 04 ~ ~· OK.,,./...< ___ . VALIDATE NO r- "'~ ---~ r1106 MATCH? . ···L_Q_fl_ ALLOW DO NOT ALLOW COMMUNICATION COMMUNICATION Ex. G-352 0 Title: Matching Process System and Method Inventors: Sean Rad et al. Atty. Dkt. No. 076533.0150 8111 FJ(J. 12A Ex. G-353 0 Title: Matching Process System and Method Inventors: Sean Rad et al. Atty. Dkt. No. 076533.0150 9111 ~ Sent Matches r~_. ................................................. m ......................................................,, .· ...• 1204 ~Q Searc~ ____) FIG. 128 Ex. G-354 0 Title: Matching Process System and Method Inventors: Sean Rad et al. Atty. Dkt. No. 076533.0150 J 0/.11 ~ Sent Matches 1206- Jonathan Mary Major Make a Match! Smith 1204-- 1202·--- FIG. .12C' Ex. G-355 0 Title: Matching Process System and Method Inventors: Sean Rad et al. Atty. Dkt. No. 076533.0150 11/11 ~;~}"~ Ashok r~} . /-i 208 t\t~'B7\l, l')\ . \1 11 Hey! Hows it going? My nam...")-"._@ ............................................. ~.~---------·-······ ..........._................................ ~----·--·--·--···--········--··----· ..................... f~/~--J~· h. ' Jonathan ~ }~· I,··'[\~A"'·.,,··· M~tched on 12;4 .·,.Ld.:,-:2.,... ·;r by. Ashok Kumar '···---"'-··~-----------. .......................~.-~~ t -:;:;;:::;r--· .. --~"-------·······--'·--····----·----· ···············--······-·-~-..........,..,~·---·------------····. FIG. 12D Ex. G-356 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0150 IN THE UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE First Named Inventor: Sean Rad et al. Filed: Herewith Group Art Unit: Unknown Confirmation No. Unkn~wn Examiner: Unknown Title: Matching Process System and Method Commissioner for Patents P.O. Box 1450 Alexandria, Virginia 22313-1450 Dear Sir: Preliminary Amendment Prior to the initial review of this non-provisional utility continuation patent application entitled "Matching Process System and Method" by Sean Rad, et al., please amend the application as follows. Ex. G-357 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0150 2 IN THE SPECJFICA TION Please replace the RELATED APPLICATIONS section with the following section: RELATED APPLTCA TIONS This application is a continuation in pait of Serial No. 12/339,301, entitled "MATCHING PROCESS SYSTEM AND METHOD," Attorney's Docket 076533.0130 filed December 19, 2008. Tbis application claims benefit under 35 U.8.C. § 1l9(e) to U.S. Provisional Application Serial No. 61/793,866, entitled "SOCIAL MATCHfNG SYSTEM A-1-JD METHOD," /\ttorney's Docket 076533.0146, filed March 15, 2013. This application is a continuation application of U.S. Patent Application No. 14/059,192, entitled "MATCHING PROCESS SYSTEM AND METHOD," Attorney's Docket 076533.0146, filed October 21, 2013, currently pending; which (a) is a continuation- in-pmt of U.S. Patent Application No. 12/339301, entitled "MATCHING PROCESS SYSTEM AND METHOD," Attorney's Docket No. 076533.0130, filed December 19, 2008, now U.S. Patent No. 8,566,327, issued October 22, 2013; and (b) claims benefit under 35 U.S.C. § 119(e) to U.S. Provisional Application Serial No. 61/793,866, entitled "SOCIAL MATCHING SYSTEM AND METHOD," Attorney's Docket No. 076533.0146, filed March 15, 2013. Ex. G-358 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0150 3 JN THE CLAIMS Claims 1-43 (Cancelled) 44. (New) A method of navigating a user interface, comprising: presenting, on a graphical user interface, a graphical representation of a first item of information of a plurality of items of information; detecting a gesture associated with the graphical representation of the first item of information, the gesture corresponding to a preference indication associated with the first item of information; storing the preference indication associated with the first item of information in response to detecting the gesture; automatically presenting, on the graphical user interface, a graphical representation of a second item of information of the plurality of items of information in response to detecting the gesture; and automatically removing the graphical representation of the first item of information from the graphical user interface in response to detecting the gesture. 45. (New) The method of Claim 44, wherein presenting the graphical representation of the first item of information of the plurality of items of information comprises presenting user interface controls such that all user interface controls configured to cause another item of information of the plurality of items of information to be displayed are associated with performing an action on the first item of information. 46. (New) The method of Claim 44, wherein detecting the gesture associated with the graphical representation of the first item of information comprises detecting a swiping direction associated with the gesture, the swiping direction indicating approval of the first item of information. 47. (New) The method of Claim 44, wherein presenting the graphical representation of the first item of information of the plurality of items of information comprises presenting the first item of information as a first card of a stack of cards. Ex. G-359 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PA TENT APPLICATION 076533.0150 4 48. (New) The method of Claim 44, wherein: the first item of information comprises a first user profile; the second item of information comprises a second user profile; and the preference indication associated with the first item of information comprises an expression of approval for a user associated with the first user profile. Ex. G-360 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0 I 50 5 49. (New) A system, comprising: an interface operable to: present a graphical representation of a first item of information of a plurality of items of information; a processor coupled to the interface and operable to: detect a gesture associated with the graphical representation of the first item of information, the gesture corresponding to a preference indication associated with the first item of information; store the preference indication associated with the first item of information in response to detecting the gesture; and the interface further operable to: automatically present a graphical representation of a second item of information of the plurality of items of information in response to the processor detecting the gesture; and automatically remove the graphical representation of the first item of information in response to detecting the gesture. 50. (New) The system of Claim 49, wherein the processor is fmther operable to: detect a swiping direction associated with the gesture; and determine that the swiping direction indicates approval of the first item of information. 51. (New) The system of Claim 49, wherein the interface is further operable to present the first item of information as a first card of a stack of cards. 52. (New) The system of Claim 49, wherein: the first item of information comprises a first user profile; the second item of information comprises a second user profile; and the preference indication associated with the first item of information comprises an expression of approval for a user associated with the first user profile. Ex. G-361 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0150 6 53. (New) The system of Claim 49, wherein the interface is further operable to present user interface controls such that all user interface controls configured to cause another item of information of the plurality of items of information to be displayed are associated with performing an action on the first item of information. Ex. G-362 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0150 7 54. (New) At least one non-transitory computer-readable medium comprising a plurality of instructions that, when executed by at least one processor, are configured to: present, on a graphical user interface, a graphical representation of a first item of information of a plurality of items of information; detect a gesture associated with the graphical representation of the first item of information, the gesture corresponding to a preference indication associated with the first item of information; store the preference indication associated with the first item of information m response to detecting the gesture; automatically present, on the graphical user interface, a graphical representation of a second item of information of the plurality of items of information in response to detecting the gesture; and automatically remove the graphical representation of the first item of information from the graphical user interface in response to detecting the gesture. 55. (New) The at least one non-transitory computer-readable medium of Claim 54, wherein the plurality of instructions are further configured to: detect a swiping direction associated with the gesture; and determine that the swiping direction indicates approval of the first item of information. 56. (New) The at least one non-transitory computer-readable medium of Claim 54, wherein the plurality of instructions are configured to present the first item of information as a first card ofa stack of cards. 57. (New) The at least one non-transitory computer-readable medium of Claim 54, wherein: the first item of information comprises a first user profile; the second item of information comprises a second user profile; and the preference indication associated with the first item of information comprises an expression of approval for a user associated with the first user profile. Ex. G-363 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0150 8 58. (New) The at least one non-transitory computer-readable medium of Claim 54, wherein the plurality of instructions are further configured to present user interface controls such that all user interface controls configured to cause another item of information of the plurality of items of information to be displayed are associated with performing an action on the first item of information. Ex. G-364 0 ATTORNEY'S DOCKET PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0150 9 REMARKS Entry of this Amendment is respectfully requested. If the Examiner feels that a telephone conference or an interview would advance prosecution of this Application in any manner, the undersigned attorney for Applicants stands ready to conduct such a conference at the convenience of the Examiner. Although Applicants believe no fee is due, the Commissioner is hereby authorized to charge any required fee or credit any overpayment to Deposit Account No. 02-0384 of Baker Botts L.L.P. Respectfully submitted, BAKER BOTTS L.L.P. Attorneys for Applicants /;::.f:~c-9L/,___ _ _: Roshan S. Mansinghani Reg. No. 62,429 Date: February 5, 2016 Correspondence Address: Customer No: 05073 Ex. G-365 0 ATTORNEY DOCKET NO. PATENT APPLICATION 076533.0150 1 IN THE UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE In re application of: Sean Rad et al. Filed: Herewith Title: Matching Process System and Method Commissioner for Patents P.O. Box 1450 Alexandria, Virginia 22313-1450 Dear Sir: INFORMATION DISCLOSURE STATEMENT Applicants respectfully request, pursuant to 37 C.F.R. §§ 1.56, 1.97 and 1.98, that the references listed on the attached PT0-1449 form, and yreviously cited in U.S. Application Serial No. 12/339,301 filed December 19, 2008 by Applicants, and entitled "Matching Process System and Method," be considered and cited in the examination of the above-identified continuation patent application. Pursuant to 37 C.F.R. § l.98(d), copies of these references are not being furnished. Furthermore, pursuant to 37 C.F.R. § l.97(h), no representation is made that these references qualify as prior art or that these references are material to the patentability of the present application. Pursuant to 37 C.F.R. § l.97(b), Applicants believe no fee is currently due. However, if a fee is required, the Commissioner is hereby authorized to charge any necessary fees and credit any overpayments to Deposit Account No. 02-03 84 of Baker Botts L.L.P. Respectfully submitted, BAKER BOTTS L.L.P. Attorneys for Applicants Roshan S. Mansinghani Registration No. 62,429 Dated: February 5, 2016 Customer Number 05073 Active 17315185 Ex. G-366